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Aging and Disability Resource Connection helps seniors remain at home

Oregon seniors looking for information about services to help them safely stay at home and avoid long-term care facilities was one of the leading topics callers asked about in 2013 to the Aging and Disability Resource Connection.

Nearly 63,000 people called either the statewide toll-free number or their local community ADRC for assistance. One of the largest group of callers requested information about how to access in-home supports.

This included asking about caregivers, adult day care, transportation, meals, home modifications, services and other essentials to help the individual to stay in their own home.

The callers were the individuals themselves, a family member, friend and neighbor or agency representative seeking information, referral and assistance.

"Oregon has long been a leader in helping people who are aging or have a physical disability remain at home," said Mike McCormick, director of the Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities Program. "People are looking for stability and independence at home and in their local communities, and ADRC is here to help achieve that goal. Having a single access point makes it so easy for anyone to call and get what they need."

Oregon's ADRC is a "one-stop shop" for older adults, people with physical disabilities and their caregivers and families to get information and services as their health and long-term care needs change. The ADRC is easily accessible for people seeking long-term services and information to identify options that best suit their needs.

"Oregon is working to develop and implement strategies to serve seniors and people with physical disabilities in their own homes and community settings of their own choosing," McCormick said. "These changes will support independence and delay the entry of individuals into publicly funded long term services and supports."

Kellie Harrold of Albany called her local ADRC recently to inquire about care for her aging mother, who had suffered a series of strokes.

"My mom values her independence and being able to live in her own home," she said. "She did not want to go to a care facility, and I don't think that would have been a good move for her. We contacted our local ADRC, and a counselor helped us walk through our options.

"ADRC helped us to see the big picture and we are grateful. We were able to respect mom's needs and wishes, and ADRC helped us do the right thing for her by allowing her to have a say in her own future and choices."

ADRC offices are located in Multnomah, Clackamas, Washington, Columbia, Marion, Polk, Yamhill, Clatsop, Tillamook, Linn, Benton, Lincoln, Lane, Jackson and Josephine counties currently, and the state expects to have ADRC services available statewide by 2015.

However, anyone anywhere in Oregon can call the toll-free statewide number for assistance or use the website.

For more information, visit www.adrcoforegon.org or call 1-855-ORE-ADRC.