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Beaverton High sports facilities aim for A+

Plans include synthetic turf and upgraded facilities on the 100-year-old campus


COURTESY BEAVERTON HIGH SCHOOL - This artist's renderings show just a few of the changes forthcoming to the athletic facilities at Beaverton High School under an ambitious donor-funded plan that will kick off this summer.Work will begin this summer on a multi-million-dollar project that will give 100-year-old Beaverton High School some of the best athletic facilities around.

Beaverton School District officials are expected next month to OK a contract with a company to polish up designs for synthetic turf fields, upgraded buildings, grandstands, a pavilion and amphitheater areas at the school for what Principal Anne Erwin said will collectively be an “outdoor community center” with places to play and watch high school sports.

“We want it to represent the pride that people feel here,” Erwin said.

Meanwhile, the first project will get underway this summer as the district refurbishes and reorients the natural grass baseball and softball field along Southwest Farmington Road so it also can be used for soccer and lacrosse. The infield will be covered with synthetic turf at a later date.

That first project is being funded by the district, while the remaining work planned — to the tune of about $5 million — will be paid for through the Beaverton High School Success Fund, a donor-driven fund aimed at improving the city’s oldest high school.

The next phases, which are already funded and scheduled for construction in the summer of 2017, will include converting infields of the school’s baseball and softball fields and other improvements west of Southwest Erickson Avenue, as well as remodeling concessions areas and adding athletic storage on the east side of Erickson behind the main school building.

Later phases have not yet been scheduled or fully funded. The current plan includes installing synthetic turf on the school’s practice field, building a booster pavilion, erecting a bell tower and making major improvements to the grandstands and other amenities around the school’s primary field. The exact cost and scope of the work will depend on future donations and market conditions as fundraising continues.

Erwin said improvements are aimed at building pride in the school, establishing a destination spot for various activities, improving the basic services at the school (including physical education) and doing it all in an environmentally sustainable way.

Right now, students often are limited to sharing the school’s single synthetic turf field for sports, band and other uses because the grass fields are too sloppy for much of the year.

“Even if it’s a nice day in the middle of winter ... if the grass is wet, they can’t go out there,” Erwin said.

Erwin noted that the 36-acre school, in the heart of the city’s historic neighborhoods, is landlocked.

“We have to make the best use of the facilities that we have,” she said.

Other Success Fund projects are more rooted in the classrooms, including a total of $60,000 in mini-grants teachers are being awarded during this academic year to enhance their classroom instruction, Erwin said.COURTESY BEAVERTON HIGH SCHOOL - This artist's renderings show just a few of the changes forthcoming to the athletic facilities at Beaverton High School under an ambitious donor-funded plan that will kick off this summer.