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Richard Brenne explains it all to us

One-man show covering just about everything debuts at Stuhr Center in front of friends
by: Jaime Valdez, Richard Brenne shares his funny and insightful perspective on “The Truth About Everything.”

Richard Brenne believes it's time for folks to head for higher ground.

'We're about to be hit by a metaphoric global tsunami,' he said 'We are facing very real, immediate and dangerous global warming and energy problems.

'We have many environmental challenges that could become catastrophes. We're seeing the ocean recede to gather itself, being prepared for that is really smart.'

It's time for people to open their eyes to the world around them and work together to create change, Brenne added.

The Beaverton native returned this week to his old stomping grounds to share his message with local audiences, kicking off a tour of his one-man-show, 'The Truth About Everything.'

The 1974 Beaverton High School graduate earned a bachelor's degree and master of fine arts from the University of California Los Angeles film school.

For more than three decades he's been a successful screenwriter, winning the Jack Nicholson Award for Screenwriting and writing screenplays most recently produced by HBO and Warner Brothers.

He's also had work published in The Christian Science Monitor, Sports Illustrated and other national newspapers and magazines.

His latest project is his most ambitious work to date as he prepares to combine all his interests into a multi-media franchise that includes a book, his one-man-show, video, Web site and blog.

'Everything in my career is coming together,' Brenne said of his 'Truth' project. 'I have a real tremendous passion to communicate important ideas that include ways to tackle global warming and peak oil issues.

'I've thought about these issues a great deal and had conversations with the best thinkers about them.'

The messenger

He considers himself to be a 'popularizer' of scientists' and other experts' ideas.

'I take their messages to the public,' Brenne explained. 'We don't have enough popularizers communicating what is really important about scientists' findings and what they mean to us.

'I talk about things that the public needs to be alerted to. We need to get to the highest ground we can as soon as we can. We need to realize how serious some of these situations are, yet we don't want people to despair. Instead, we want them to think about what they can do to change things.'

So what's the solution?

First, think like a 19-year-old, he said.

'When you're 19 and young, you think you can do anything,' Brenne said. 'We can find very unexpected solutions to problems when we open our minds and believe in our abilities.'

Second, think globally and focus on actions that can be taken individually and collectively to reach higher ground.

'We need a dramatic shift in consciousness,' Brenne said. 'When that happens, then everything could change. Together we can start to shift consciousness and find solutions to the problems we face.'

Begin the climb

Through his writing and public appearances, Brenne uses his wit as a comedian and history buff to take audiences on a journey threading events in history with what is happening in the world today to weave together a plan on how best to shape the future.

'We tend to focus on just what is in front of us, not what is going on all around us,' he said. 'Imagine you're on a grassy plateau and ahead of you is a cliff that you need to scale.

'It looks insurmountable. What you don't see is that below you are lower plateaus that your ancestors had to climb to get you to where you are. Together, we can overcome any challenge. All we need to do is focus and look at the challenge ahead. Once we see the magnitude, we can choose the route we are going to take and begin the climb.'

To contact Richard Brenne, e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..