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Relics from bygone eras are found in kitchen drawer

Utensils that were once so useful are now no longer necessary

While looking in a kitchen drawer for an item I needed, I noticed that it had been a long, long time since that drawer had been straightened out.

I removed everything to the countertop and then washed out the drawer. When I started putting things back, I found that a lot of them were so totally out of date that I was amazed.

When did they stop putting those metal bands around coffee, Spam and corned beef cans? I had two sizes of those sturdy little keys with the slots in them.

It brought back memories of blood and Band-aids from the times those bands didn't come off easily.

Next were the key-hole shaped bottle cap removers. How long ago did we stop having to pry the tops off of drink bottles? I had two of those, too.

There were six medicine droppers, used for giving doses of liquid remedies to various cats through the years. A new one always comes with a prescription from the veterinarian, so why had I kept all of these?

There were coffee filters for two sizes of coffeemakers I no longer have; also, a strange short wire with a loop at each end.

Oh, yes! I finally remembered that it was a replacement part for that cheese-slicer I used to have. I buy my cheese already sliced now.

We could not have had a can of pop or a beer all those years without that flat, metal thing with the pointy end to punch a hole in the top of the can.

Now, with all the pull tabs, I will only keep one of these, in case canned milk still needs one when it's pumpkin pie time.

One clever little metal gadget had me stumped for quite a while. Then I figured out that it must be a cherry-pitter.

I've never pitted a cherry in my life, so I think it must have belonged to my husband's first wife. She was a very good cook and even canned food - a cherry-pitter type of person.

Next came two nutcrackers that these arthritic hands will never squeeze again. I buy nuts already cracked and neatly packaged at Trader Joe's.

Lastly, I found a frost scraper for refrigerators. Well what refrigerator was that, I wondered?

I took a moment to be grateful for the miracle of self-defrosting.

One big clue to the passé aspect of these items is that most were stamped "Made in the U.S.A." One of the bottle-openers reads, "Drink Pepsi-Cola." I will give that to a friend who is addicted to that brand.

There are two other tools that I will keep even though they are very old.

One is my old fashioned egg-beater. There is nothing better for whipping cream for that pumpkin pie.

The other is an ice pick. Well, you never know when you might need one of those!

After the kitchen drawer was put back with the surviving items neatly arranged inside, I thought I should probably tackle the office supplies drawer in my computer room.

The first thing I spied was something I just recently had use for - a small box of 200 little paper rings with lick-able glue on the back. "Dennison's Reinforcements" was printed on the box along with "Made in the U.S.A." and "Price 10 cents."

Here was proof that some products certainly do stand the test of time. I'll save the rest of this drawer for another day.

(Lynn S. Turner is a Tigard resident with an adventurous spirit who likes to look at the world in creative ways.)