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Teen charged with school phone hoax

Fifteen counts are leveled against the Beaverton High freshman

A 14-year-old Beaverton High School freshman was arrested Monday in connection with phone calls claiming someone was carrying a gun at Beaverton and Southridge high schools.

Police charged the unnamed youth with two counts of disorderly conduct, two counts of inititaing a false report and 11 counts of improper use of 911 based on recent calls the youth allegedly made.

In addition to the two high school calls, police are still investigating nine additional calls made to the 911 dispatch center believed to be made by the youth between Sept. 1 and 9, according to Officer Mark Hyde, Beaverton police spokesman. The youth was lodged at the Donald E. Long Home, a juvenile detention facility.

The calls still being investigated include those made involving bomb threats and other erroneous reports of men with guns at various locations, said Hyde.

'It's possible he could be charged with more offenses,' said Hyde.

One of the latest calls occurred Saturday when a caller to 911 dispatch said, 'There's a guy with a gun' at a Southridge High School soccer game, said Hyde.

Hyde said a visual search at Southridge was made, but since there were no classes going on at the time no students were affected.

However, that wasn't the case at Beaverton High School Thursday when a caller phoned in at 1 p.m. to say, 'There's a fight at the high school, and there's a gun involved,' then hung up.

That sent the school into a 'lock-in' mode where students were confined to their classrooms for more than 1½ hours.

After an extensive search by Beaverton police, the incident ended and about 2,000 students were dismissed for the day.

During the lock-in, an estimated 20 officers and detectives searched the main building, cafeteria and Merle Davies facility. At 2:40 p.m., police finished their search, found nothing and allowed students to leave 10 minutes later than their normal dismissal time.

The school district takes any call regarding a weapon seriously, said Maureen Wheeler, district spokeswoman.

'We've got to,' she said.