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Don't shoot the messenger

'Don't shoot the messenger.' Have you ever heard that saying? It's used whenever someone blames the bearer of unappetizing news for the news itself. This phrase becomes especially poignant in light of journalism, which has the precarious duty of reporting stories that are sometimes unpleasant.

At The Post's booth at the Sandy Oktoberfest this past weekend, our circulation director, Ryan McVicker, fielded a complaint from a reader who said he is sick of reading about Fouad Kaady, the 26-year-old Gresham man who died in a police-involved shooting just north of town a year ago.

In last week's paper, we published a story that told how Kaady's family and the law enforcement community are doing one year after the incident that rocked our community. We didn't hash over old arguments. We didn't point fingers or even talk about what the finger-pointers are saying. We simply took a look back at one of the most unfortunate happenings in our community and a look forward.

This week, the Kaadys are in the news again, with the announcement of a major lawsuit against Clackamas County, the city of Sandy and the two officers who shot Kaady.

Regardless of how you feel about the incident itself, this is a completely new story. A federal lawsuit has serious implications for Sandy's financial status, for the way law enforcement handles perceived cases of 'excited delirium' and for the future of a local cop.

We have a responsibility to report this kind of news, one that we take very seriously. We won't shirk that responsibility and bury important developments just because the name that's attached to the case evokes pain or anger in some people.

Don't get us wrong, we're not about to make this a recurring topic. While we don't intend to give you story after story in issue after issue about this case (on the front page or elsewhere) in the hyper-sensationalized style of other media outlets, we will give you the news that's important to our community, no more, no less. That's all we ever intend to do. Just don't shoot the messenger.