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Corbett student honored for scholastic success

The College Board has recognized eight students at Corbett High School for their achievements on Advanced Placement exams.

Six students earned the designation of AP Scholar by the College Board in recognition of their exceptional achievement on the college-level exams.

The six qualified for the AP Scholar Award by completing three or more AP Examinations, with grades of 3 or higher. Corbett's 2006 AP Scholars are Eve Bryggman, Antonia Luna, Molly Moshofsky (all 2006 graduates), Alex Grey, Lauren Miller and Samuel Schwartz, all members of the class of 2007.

Andrew Hanes, also a member of the class of 2007, has been designated a Scholar With Honor for having completed four exams with scores of 3 or above.

Joshua Marsh, class of 2006, was recognized as a Scholar With Distinction for completing five exams with a score of 3 or above.

Fifty-five Corbett students took AP exams in May 2006 after completing challenging college-level courses at their high schools. Thirty-one students earned a score of 3 or higher on at least one exam.

Most of the nation's colleges and universities award credit, advanced placement or both, based on successful performance on the AP exams.

Centennial senior to serve again on state committee

State Schools Superintend-ent Susan Castillo has announced that Mishaela Burnside, a senior at Centennial High School, has been selected to serve her third year on the Youth Advisory Team.

This team is a group of students from all over Oregon who meet five or six times a year to discuss issues related to education and give recommendations to the Superintendent. The team's first meeting of the school year was held Friday, Oct. 20, at the Oregon Department of Education.

'I am listening to the students that we serve,' Castillo said. 'They play an important role in changing and improving public education in Oregon by using their experiences as students to inform me, the State Board of Education, legislators, educators and business and community leaders,' Castillo said.

'Students need a voice in the decisions that impact them. Decisions cannot be made about education without the input of students.

'This Youth Advisory Team has provided me with the opportunity to get to know our youth through mature and intense discussions that continue to teach me as well as remind me why I am in this business,' Castillo said.

Burnside is a varsity cheerleader, does gymnastics and plays club soccer.

She was the Gresham representative in the State Junior Miss Pageant.

'I applied to be part of the Youth Advisory Team to have a voice and to learn more about how the government works in regards to our school system,' Burnside said.

'I think that the most important issue facing students is to be able to complete high school and continue on to the next level of education. School funding is huge. Most importantly, we need to keep the fun in learning.'

Spirit Mountain supports reading program

The Gresham-Barlow Education Foundation was recently the recipient of a $10,000 grant award to support reading activities in the Gresham-Barlow School District.

Specifically, the funds will support an elementary school Learning to Read program and help provide library support in targeted schools within the district.

The Learning to Read program is designed to give teachers additional resources to meet the individualized needs of the struggling readers in their first through third grade classrooms. Research indicates that 74 percent of children diagnosed with a reading problem in the third grade will continue with problems into the ninth grade.

Through the Learning to Read program, struggling readers in all eleven elementary schools in the district are identified and provided targeted, one-on-one assistance to improve their reading ability.

School libraries also play a key role in improving literacy. Studies show there is a positive relationship between effective school library media centers and student achievement in reading. Funds for library support will help expand book collections and add to the culturally diverse media resources already available.

Spirit Mountain Community Fund donates about $5 million each year to local programs and services that benefit citizens striving for self-sufficiency. Spirit Mountain Community Fund is the philanthropic arm of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde.

'As a tribal community, we understand the value of early education, especially literacy,' Director Shelley Hanson said. 'Our Tribal Council and Board of Trustees have deep felt interest in the success of children and families. Helping young, struggling readers overcome their challenges brings value to their families as well as the rest of us in their community.'

The Gresham-Barlow Education Foundation was formed in 1994 to assist the schools of the Gresham-Barlow School District in providing the best possible educational opportunities for its students.

The Foundation's priorities are to provide funding for educational opportunities that enhance basic reading, writing, math and science skills. Last year the foundation provided over $150,000 of support to district classrooms. For more information about the Foundation and how you can become involved, call 503-766-0008.

Project Lead the Way hosts conference

Project Lead the Way, a national program designed to attract more students to engineering while still in high school, will hold a counseling conference and informational session from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 16, at Clackamas Community College in Oregon City. This conference is for interested high school counselors, administrators and teachers.

In addition to this conference, there is a summer training session available for educators to gain helpful experience in integrating engineering into their classrooms.

Oregon Institute of Technology is the project's lead university in Oregon.

The conference will have an overview of PLTW with breakout sessions containing helpful tips on recruitment, getting started and engineering pathways.

To learn more about the conference or to register, contact Barb Metcalf at 1-541-885-1494 or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..