Featured Stories

Other Pamplin Media Group sites

Hass bides his time as Bears rise

Sports Sources Say
by: , HASS

If practice makes perfect, Mike Hass is on his way. The Biletnikoff Award winner out of Jesuit High and Oregon State remains on the Chicago Bears' practice squad, waiting to suit up for his first NFL game.

'It's disappointing, because I came here hoping to play,' says Hass, who was waived by New Orleans during the preseason. 'It hasn't happened yet, but there's still some time left in the season. I just have to keep working hard, I guess.'

Hass is a member of the Bears' scout team.

'It's pretty much like redshirting in college,' he says.

He catches passes from No. 3 quarterback Kyle Orton and goes against the No. 1-ranked defense in the NFL.

'We do pretty well against them,' Hass says. 'We get them ready for the games on Sunday, and we get better each week, too.'

If Chicago wins the Super Bowl, Hass will get a ring. Maybe by that time he will get his chance on the field.

'Of course, you want to play,' Hass says. 'But like my dad tells me, there are a lot of guys who wish they were in my spot.'

Stark enshrined in hall of fame

The greatest schoolboy player in the history of the state recently was honored with induction into the U.S. Tennis Association/Pacific Northwest Tennis Hall of Fame.

Medford native Jonathan Stark, 35, was the U.S. Open junior boys champion and an All-American at Stanford. He was ranked No. 1 in the world in doubles on the Association of Tennis Professionals circuit. He was a member of the U.S. Davis Cup squad and, with Martina Navratilova, a 1995 Wimbledon mixed-doubles champion.

Stark joins Elwood Cooke, Walter Goss, Phil Neer, Sam Lee, Emery Neale and Doris Popple as hall members from Oregon.

'It's really neat,' said Stark, now director of tennis at the Seattle Tennis Club. 'I take a lot of pride in coming from the Northwest. I always believed you could make it, even as a kid from Medford, Oregon. This honor is another example of the great support I had from the people of this area during my career.'

-Tribune staff