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Two WL schools fall short of AYP benchmark

Rosemont Ridge, WLHS didn't meet state standards

For the first time, West Linn's Rosemont Ridge Middle School did not meet the state's Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) targets during the 2010-2011 school year, according to a report released by the Oregon Department of Education Aug. 2.

And, for the second year running, West Linn High School also did not meet the requirements. However, as a whole, standardized-testing results improved.

Because of the two schools' failing marks, the West Linn-Wilsonville School District also received a failing status. This adequate yearly progress report is a requirement of the federal No Child Left Behind law.

AYP is measured by assessment tests for all students in each district in the state. Schools must meet benchmarks overall as well as in subgroups, such as disadvantaged students, students with disabilities, English language learners and ethnic groups.

One subgroup not meeting the standards can ding a district and that is what happened to the West Linn-Wilsonville School District.

The target percentage required to meet the ATP standards in English, language arts and math was raised 10 percent this year. Seventy percent of all students and 70 percent of all students identified in subgroups were required to reach the standards in order to get a 'met' status.

Jane Stickney, the district's deputy superintendent, said the AYP measures have increased every year since they were implemented in 2002, causing annual challenges for districts nationwide.

'Of course we want all of schools to meet every standard there is,' Stickney said. 'This is something we've been working on for quite a while.'

For Rosemont Ridge and WLHS, the subgroup of students with disabilities did not meet some of the AYP requirements.

At West Linn High School, the language arts requirement was not met because 100 percent of the students did not take the test. Three students, who don't even attend WLHS but live within its boundaries, did not take the test this last year, causing the school to get dinged.

This was a common occurrence for many districts. Each district is responsible for every student who lives within its boundaries, even though not all of them attend its schools. Such is the case with many students who have disabilities.

At Rosemont Ridge Middle School, students with disabilities did not meet reading or the math requirements. In the reading portion, 64.85 percent of the students passed, missing the 70 percent mark. In the math portion, 62.63 percent passed.

'We are always working to make sure each child is achieving success,' Stickney said.

She pointed out that, although these subgroups may not have passed this year's mark, their test scores still improved from last year. However, the challenge of meeting AYP standards is only going to get more difficult. Next year, the minimum percentage of students passing rises to 80 percent. By 2014, all state districts are expected to have 100 percent of students meeting all AYP benchmarks.

The good news is the WL-WV district saw overall growth in reading and math at all grade levels, especially among English language learners and students with disabilities.

Stickney said the district is focusing hard this year on reaching the subgroups of students with disabilities and the disadvantaged learners.

The district will receive more detailed information about student assessment scores when the official report is released.

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AYP is measured by assessment tests for all students in each district in the state. Schools must meet benchmarks overall as well as in subgroups, such as disadvantaged students, students with disabilities, English language learners and ethnic groups.