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Wheres the racism in the case of the toy gorilla?

I recently read your article about an incident that occurred when Portland police officers had a toy gorilla mounted on the front bumper of their patrol car as they responded to a reported disturbance at a hip-hop club called Ringlers (Cops: Sorry about the gorilla, Nov. 25). The article stated that the patrons and a DJ called this 'racial harassment.'

Can somebody please explain to me how a toy gorilla is racial? And once you can do that for me, can you please explain why these same hip-hop patrons don't turn around and sue every zoo in America for having gorillas inside cages for public display? Or, better yet, I see that P-Diddy is starring in a play called 'A Raisin in the Sun' about a black family moving into an all-white neighborhood. How is that not racist if a toy gorilla is?

Granted, the reasoning for the police officers mounting the gorilla on the bumper instead of putting it in the trunk is a little off the wall. But I just don't see how anyone can scream racism about a toy, but not about the title of the above-mentioned play.

I'm a little sickened by how much this 'racism card' is constantly being thrown on the table after how far we've come since Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War and the civil rights movement. Someone can be having a totally innocent conversation with another person, and if an African-American overhears something that's the least bit racist, it's suddenly a big issue.

Look, people, move on in life. Quit living in the past. Just because our ancestors had problems with skin color doesn't mean the rest of us do. Stop looking for excuses to point fingers and scream racism if you're going to have double standards.

I'd be more than happy to hear some answers to these questions.

Glenn Yeager

Sandy

Family's stolen car

turns up when towed

I read with interest your piece on the 'towing wars' (Tow costs come at too high a price, Insight, Dec. 12). We experienced a car theft from a Fred Meyer in Portland at 6:30 in the evening. The car was driven about 12 blocks to an apartment complex, where it was towed by a local company to their tow compound, and within an hour I was notified by a company it was there. We retrieved it for hundreds of dollars.

It may have been that the tow company simply watched that apartment a lot, a practice described in the Tribune article.

Also, towing fees have escalated sharply in the last few years.

Ruth Wolfe

Lake Oswego