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ZONE 3

REGAN

Candidate: Bobbie Regan

Age: 45

Neighborhood: Forest Heights

Occupation: Marketing communications consultant/schools leader

Kids in PPS? Two sons: fourth-grader at Forest Park Elementary and a seventh-grader at West Sylvan Middle

Question 1

Promote stronger leadership from the school board. We must mend relations with teachers by supporting their work with students; ensure tax dollars are focused on the classroom; and set clear, measurable achievement goals for students.

Question 2

Yes. I would protect the classroom and literacy programs from cuts. The board should work with legislators for sustainable PERS reform; sell or lease surplus administrative buildings; and work with teachers for health-care cost efficiencies.

Question 3

As a statewide schools leader, I will fight to make our schools a priority in the state budget, build stronger school-community partnerships, and improve our operations by implementing cost efficiencies and building sustainable budgets.

Question 4

Mr. Wahl, my high school business teacher, took a personal interest in each student. He encouraged us to pursue our interests and was a mentor to me while I was the yearbook business editor.

LEKAS

Candidate: John E. Lekas

Age: 44

Neighborhood: Bridlemile

Occupation: President/owner Leader Capital Corp.

Kids in PPS? Two children: sixth-grader and seventh-grader at West Sylvan Middle

Question 1

Sell the Blanchard building and move administration to Washington High School. Meet with all the principals to get a budget of their expenditures. Decentralize all the schools and let the principals run their schools.

Question 2

We would not cut anything until we saw a line-item budget for each school. Use the $25 million in proceeds from the Blanchard building as well as other cuts until the 9-10-11 plan is implemented.

Question 3

Decentralization: Let the money flow directly to the schools. Let the principals and teachers make decisions that are fit for their school and the community in which their school resides.

Question 4

Mr Black. He taught my child that learning is challenging but fun.

LAIDLER

Candidate: James R. Laidler

Age: 44

Neighborhood: West Sylvan

Occupation: Physician

Kids in PPS? Two sons, at Bridlemile and Capitol Hill elementaries

Question 1

I would like to shift more control to the individual schools in order to reduce the administrative overhead and to give the principals and the teachers more flexibility to respond to the needs of their student population.

Question 2

Although I oppose the income tax surcharge on principle ('bailouts' do not promote responsible planning), I see no alternative for the short term. If the income tax measure does not pass, the first area to cut should be those parts of the school district that do not directly teach students.

Question 3

The budget needs to conform with the current realities of school funding and not be based on how funding 'ought to be.' The current method of funding schools is extremely sensitive to economic fluctuation because it is largely based on income, rather than on more stable sources.

Question 4

My favorite teacher was Mr. Myrick (fifth grade) because he showed me that you have to do what's right even when it is a futile effort.

OAKLAND

Candidate: Sam Oakland

Age: 69

Address/Neighborhood: Northwest Portland

Occupation: Professor and director emeritus, the Siberian Law Education Centre

Kids in PPS? Two grown children, both graduates of Lincoln High

Question 1

I would like to introduce a lifelong-learning night school into every public school in this city. A Scandinavian model could be adapted here to create the most exciting and creative public educational system in this country.

Question 2

Oregon should revisit Measure 5 and find the school support needed. If cuts are needed then nearly every PPS administrator and specialist would have to find other work, and teachers would take over the schools.

Question 3

Measure 6 needs to be enacted, so as to void Measure 5, and bring the taxes on business back to where they were earlier.

Question 4

Ms. Helen Rendle, Public School No. 9 in Detroit, Mich. Ms. Rendle was a master teacher who could stare down any bully, and then get that bully to learn to walk, talk and write properly. She was also our soccer coach.

BALL

Candidate: John Ball

Age: 52

Neighborhood: Downtown

Occupation: Chief operating officer, Multnomah County

Kids in PPS? No children

Question 1

The board must immediately begin rebuilding a partnership of trust with the district's teachers and classified employees. The district's highest priority Ñ the best education for all students Ñ isn't possible in conflict with the teacher corps.

Question 2

I strongly support Measure 26-48. It's imperfect, but necessary. If it fails, we should continue to cut administrative expenses wherever possible before turning to classroom expenses. A fair, fast PERS solution would also help.

Question 3

The board must step up to a leadership role in the search for a statewide school funding solution. My experience as a statewide advocate for students and families will be an asset in this work.

Question 4

Mrs. Collins, second grade, Hebron School, Evansville, Ind. She always expected our best, saw in us the keys to the country's future and helped us see education as the key to our own futures.

WEST

Candidate: James West

Age: 26

Address/Neighborhood: Northwest Portland

Occupation: College student, on-site apartment manager

Kids in PPS? No children

Question 1

Daylight audit of the books. The audit has to be 'independent' and by a firm outside the Northwest so the firm is free of any political pressure and influence. The results of the audit need to be available to the public and in a simple format.

Question 2

If the measure fails we could look at options like: Eliminate some executive management positions. The remaining management also would have to cut their workweeks back to four days instead of five. It would be easier for administrators to catch up that missing day than teachers and students.

Question 3

First, throw out the 'we can't' attitude. Second, stop blaming teachers. Third, begin to communicate to the public with real numbers, where the dollars are really being spent. We need to stop treating every problem like it is a crisis.

Question 4

I can't think of a favorite teacher.