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Zimmermans lose house to fire after renovation

Just the Other Day
by: File photo Sharon Nesbit

1911 - The largest contract for a sidewalk ever built in Gresham was signed 100 years ago when John Metzger ordered construction of full-width walks around the block where his residence was located in Gresham, a total of 1,200 feet at a cost of $1,200. The sidewalk extended from Main to Roberts avenues on Third and Fourth streets.

Up on Mount Hood, survey crews and trail workers were clearing the way for a road that would connect Portland to Hood River.

1921 - The home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred V. Zimmerman at the corner of Cleveland and Section Line (now Division Street) caught fire 90 years ago, destroying the house and contents, valued at $2,500 but insured for $900.

The loss was regrettable, wrote The Outlook, because the Zimmermans had just spent the summer renovating and improving the house and also had just put up 150 quarts of fruits and vegetables that were destroyed. They were tarring the roof, when the tar, heated on the oil stove in the kitchen, caught fire and ignited.

1931 - Aylsworth and Martin had reduced prices on merchandise in their clothing store 80 years ago. Men's silk union suits (underwear) were knocked down to 89 cents. Curiously, they came in white, blue, pink and peach. Ladies' shoes were $3.95, as were men's oxfords.

1941 - Seventy years ago, First National Bank opened the doors of a new branch in Gresham. The bank was the product of an extended effort to bring a solid banking institution to Gresham after the collapse of banks during the Depression.

1951 - The time came 60 years ago when you could no longer just put a name and a city on the envelope and expect a letter to be delivered. From now on, the Gresham post office declared, full addresses were needed, name, street address and house number and the city. The federal inspectors had been at the Gresham post office and discovered that entirely too much time was being taken in giving greater than the normal direct service for mail with vague addresses.

1961 - Poles were installed for new lights at the Reynolds High athletic field 50 years ago. And publisher Lee Irwin had to confess to an error in the paper, saying his own daughter's name was misspelled in a list of winners of 4-H prizes. 'She says she's going to take her business after this to the Parkrose Enterprise,' Irwin quipped.

1971 - A new hotshot computer solved all the problems at the Multnomah County Intermediate Education District 40 years ago. An IBM 360-30 was put to work scheduling classes and payrolls. The new computer, educators bragged, had 65K of memory.

'Computer use is growing in education,' said Glyde Fain, operations manager of the I.E.D.

1981 - The new bug on the horizon 30 years ago was the gypsy moth, responsible for stripping 5 million acres of trees in the northeastern United States. State officials set up gypsy moth traps to see if any of the bugs were showing up here.

1991 - At the old county poor farm, dust was flying in the former power station where Mike and Brian McMenamin were converting the fire-damaged building into a pub, hoping for a late September opening. The power station, McMenamin said, would be a model for the renovation of the old Edgefield Manor, which still sat, decaying and windowless, in front of the power station.

2001 - Television sets never turned off 10 years ago as East County residents tried to take in the reality of the Sept. 11 atttacks that took out the two World Trade Center towers in New York. It was one of those times 'when you had to get together and pray,' said the Rev. Jerry Stitzel in Troutdale. A steady group of worshippers appeared at St. Henry Catholic Church to light candles and sit in quiet contemplation.

2010 - A new kind of beverage container redemption center was set to open in Wood Village at this time last year. Ike Burns, who bought the Burns feed store at Orient in 1950, died at the age of 95. And campaign mailers in the Nick Kahl versus Matt Wand campaign heated up with Wand saying that Kahl lied about his (Wand's) position on a sales tax.

Compiled and researched from The Outlook files.