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Letters to the editor for Oct. 1

Solar funds don't add up to cost

Is it just me or has mathematics some how changed so that 1+1 no longer equals 2?

When I read that $470,000, plus $124,000, for a total of $594,000, are to be spent to produce, over 20 years, a gain of $190,000 to $200,000 dollars worth of electricity, I about fell off my chair!

Now as to 'demonstrate to the community and prospective green industrial investors the city's commitment to sustainability and renewable energy' that the City Council agenda states, it seem to me it demonstrates the total lack of common sense and disconnect from reality that government shows in its hubris and rush to spend other people's money.

When is this going to end? If anyone is left to wonder why we are in such financial problems as a nation, state, county, city ... I give you people's exhibit: Gresham City Hall!

Frank Grande

Troutdale

Crosswalk needs a redesign

I couldn't agree more with the observations from John Misenheimer (Crosswalk on Division is a menace, a letter in The Outlook in the Sept 28 issue), that this new crosswalk is not only a menace, but a disaster waiting to happen.

Everyone who travels Southeast Division Street where the new Gresham-Fairview bike trail crosses this busy street knows that eventually someone is going to get hit and die. After reading his letter, I decided to check out that designated crosswalk and observed a hiker standing on the north side of Division with yellow lights flashing and cars drove right through the lights. Eventually, cars stopped and he crossed.

I have observed traffic in both directions proceeding right through the yellow flashing lights, since to most drivers it only means drive with caution, not stop when flashing even though it is a designed crosswalk with signs posted. If the city can't afford the standard red, yellow and green lights, then they need to change the yellow to flashing red lights to get drivers' attention with large signs indicating STOP on red flashing.

Yellow flashing lights might work on most designated crosswalks, but not in this case, at the bottom of a hill with cars traveling 40 mph down that hill on a four-lane street to the bike crossing at the bottom. I hope the city of Gresham will rethink this one.

Louis H. Bowerman

Portland

Slower school speed would keep children safe

In response to the somewhat extensive article entitled 'School Zone on Oregon 212 in Damascus,' published in the Oregonian on Monday, Sept, 19, I present the following for needed consideration:

When Damascus Public Works Director Steve Gaschler expresses his opinion that a decrease in speed will have a negative impact on traffic flow and possibly increase the occurrence of traffic accidents; I do not accept this conclusion. The conditions now existing are more likely to have a worse effect than adopting those measures, which contribute to safety on this state highway through this recognized congested Damascus area. I suggest that the engineering study now in progress by ODOT will, hopefully, support my position.

Additionally, I express the hope that this ODOT study will conclude that it is possible to decrease the highway speed in such a manner that the entrance into the 20 mph speed zone is not shockingly from 45 mph to 20 mph. Although this slower lessening in speed is, I believe, advantageous, I am able to observe that the school speed zone on South Carus Road, on Highway 213, appears safe and effective when the speed changes from 55 mph to 20 mph when the flashing sign is in use.

Another opinion expressed by Steve Gaschler is that when you slow traffic, you have congestion. I suggest that traffic is currently congested in this area, and there is need to adopt those measures needed to bring control into this area, which is advantageous to the city of Damascus, Damascus Christian School, children's safety and the movement of traffic through the area.

I conclude with the reminder that there is no argument that can be presented that takes away our primary concern - we need to see implemented conditions which keep our children from danger.

James H. Wakefield Sr.

Mulino