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Mountain View Hospital and Living Center nearly finished with phase I of $4 million renovation project

by: Photo By Susan Matheny - New stonework goes up in front of the Living Center during Mountain View Hospital's renovation project.


   Work is nearly complete on phase I of a $4 million renovation project, at Mountain View Hospital and Living Center, which broke ground August 2002.
   The 50,000-square-foot structure is being modernized and expanded in three phases to allow the hospital to deliver patient care in a better format. Spaces are being redesigned to give patients and visitors easier access to outdoor courtyards, and the feel of the outdoors is being brought inside through nature patterned tiles and curtains, and more natural light indoors.
   Hospital Public Relations Representative Leslie Thornton gave The Pioneer a tour of three areas last week for a peek at what's going on.
   The medical-surgical wing has been remodeled with a new, more open nurses station, raised ceiling with recessed softer lighting, and natural colors.
   Patient rooms are accented with oval mirrors, leaf-print curtains, nature-print tiles, and recessed lighting.
   "It softens up the institutional look and gives it a nature or lodge feel," Thornton said, comparing the homey look to the former bright lights and white corridors.
   Each room also has its own bathroom with shower, and all outlets for medical gases, like oxygen, are now located in the wall instead of in metal tanks wheeled into the room.
   Besides the main nurses station, small two-person stations are located throughout the wing to allow nurses to be closer to the patients they are serving.
   A family lounge, complete with TV and microwave, allows relatives to be closer and to have more privacy than in one large hospital waiting room.
   In the skilled nursing care wing, a family suite provides a rest-room and two lounge areas where relatives can sit, watch TV, take a shower or even spend the night.
   The Living Center has undergone the most remodeling. What used to be the nurses station is now the new beauty and barber shop.
   Here also, there are smaller decentralized nurses stations to keep staff closer to patient rooms.
   The dining area is in the same location, but has beautiful restaurant-style overhead lights, and a striking redwood floor, that upon close inspection turns out to be vinyl flooring.
   Made to look more like a conventional home, the living center dining room has its own kitchenette with stove and refrigerator, a dining alcove with formal dining table and china cabinet where residents can dine family-style with relatives, and an entryway furnished with Victorian-style furniture, soft lamps and carpeting.
   Crews are still working to complete rockwork for the elaborate new outside entrance for the living center, then phase I will be complete, Thornton said.
   Phase II will focus on the remodeling of the lab, radiology, emergency room, enlargement of the surgical facilities, and a new entryway and waiting area on the east side of the hospital.
   "Patients will be able to receive the care they need without an interruption," Thornton said, assuring the public that the various areas will continue to operate.
   The third and final phase will be the landscaping of grounds all around the hospital.
   The project is being done by Baugh Construction, architectural work is by Clark Kjos, which specializes in hospitals, and the landscaping will be done by MacDonald Environmental Planning.