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Jack's Place offers handcrafted items

by: Photo by Billy Gates - Jack Barron, seen here steadying a lamp he made, sells handcrafted items at his new shop, Jack's Place.

For Jack Barron, it's all about giving back.
   Barron, owner and operator of Jack's Place, 224 S.W. Fifth St., is taking his love for handcrafting one-of-a-kind items and not just opening a business -- but helping out Madras' youth as well.
   Barron, who is set to open his shop "as soon as he gets his business license," will donate 10 percent of his profits to the Madras High School athletics department and the Jefferson County Kids Club.
   "In my eyes, the best thing you can do is give back to kids," Barron said.
   What Barron makes is "out of the ordinary," as he put it, but he welcomes any custom order from anyone about virtually anything.
   In his store, he has samples of clocks, plaques, picture frames and an assortment of other decor that ranges from Western to Native American themes.
   But, really, the possibilities of what he can do are nearly endless, he said.
   "All the customer has to do is pick a theme and I can build something around it," Barron said. "Anything I build will be one of a kind."
   He also has antiques and other items for sale, mainly things he finds interesting at yard sales, along with nick-nacks, collectibles and "old things."
   His goal is appeal to just about any taste and be the place to go when someone is trying to find that perfect gift for someone who is hard to buy for.
   Barron closed a custom motorcycle shop and "wanted to take it easy," so he moved back to Madras, his hometown, and decided the shop was what he wanted to pursue.
   "I have such fond memories of growing up here," he said. He is a 1970 grad of MHS. "It's the right time in my life to come home."
   Once he gets the store up and running, he hopes to open the back room to buy, sell, trade, consign and repair toys.
   While he's working in a friend's shop to produce and fill his custom orders, he hopes one day he can move his workshop on-site.
   Until then, however, he's going to continue his craft and do his part to help kids in the area, which is his true passion.