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Cronin, Akerberg win annual hotshot run

Prineville Memorial Hotshot Run goes off without a hitch until time to post results

by: JASON CHANEY/CENTRAL OREGONIAN - Maggie Akerberg sprints towards the finish line of the Prineville Memorial Hotshot Run on Saturday. Akerberg was the first woman finisher in the race, which was won by Sean Cronin.

Central Oregonian
   Saturday morning, runners cruised to the finish line under sunny skies.
   With perfect weather and 172 racers, organizers were pleased with the outcome of this year’s Prineville Hotshot Memorial Run.
   “It went really well,” said race spokesperson Amber Sitz. “It was really exciting because the hotshot crew was able to come this year and they bring a lot of energy to the event.”
   The annual event, which starts and ends in Ochoco Creek Park, was changed from 5K and 8K races to just one 5K race this year.
   With all the runners in one race, competition for first place was fierce. Sean Cronin finally came out on top, finishing the course in less than 18 minutes.
   Maggie Akerberg was the first woman finisher, while Turquoise Von Borstel and Ryan Davidson were the winners of the walking race.
   The entire event went just as planned — that is until it was time to post the results. “We had a lot of local help and support,” Sitz said. “We had some helpers who were so generous and kind, but they threw away all the tags on the board with the results away after the race. I was just heartbroken.”
   As a result of the miscue, results were not available from the race. Still, even without results, event organizers were satisfied with the outcome.
   Sitz was quick to remind everyone that the purpose of the annual race is to honor the nine members of the Prineville Hotshot crew who died fighting a forest fire on Storm King Mountain, Colo., in 1994. In addition, all proceeds from the race go to support the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, which honors fallen firefighters and provides support to their families.
   With the event more about remembering than racing, organizers plan to return to the park next year for the 20th annual running of the race.