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The joys of central Oregon weather

Spring’s changeable weather can wreak havoc on the common gardener

by: Vance Tong - Vance W. Tong is the publisher and editor of the Central Oregonian. He can be reached at: 
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I know I said I was going to try and not talk about my yard and my seemingly never-ending battle with the forces of nature, but recent weather patterns have dictated otherwise.
   Like most people, I love being out in the sun. And while I don't relish spending all my time working in the yard while the sun is shining, sometimes a guy's gotta do what a guy's gotta do. Like mow the lawn for example.
   I was all set to get a head start on mowing my lawn during the recent warm weather, when Mother Nature foiled my plans and let loose with a deluge of rain.
   Most of the time, I wouldn't care too awful much, but I'm trying to avoid the lawn debacle of last spring when I let the grass grow too long, I cut it too short, and then most of it died.
   So when I have the inclination to actually go take care of my lawn, I'd like a little help from Mother Nature. Instead, what do I get? Weather that warms up, rain that follows, grass that grows like it's on steroids, and all the while, it's too wet to mow.
   Of course all this wet, warm weather has also done wonders for my weed crop.
   I'm now considering abandoning the battle against the weed population and investigating the possibility of raising them professionally. Maybe there's some sort of federal subsidy available for growing weeds professionally.
   Of course, rain and sun are only part of the weather picture here in central Oregon. On occasion, we're also blessed with snowfall.
   So once the snow melts, the rain subsides, and the sun has dried my lawn out enough, I'll be the one with the scythe behind my house and wading through what was once a nice, manageable, green lawn.