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Quick fix wont help landmark

Readers' Letters
by: Christopher Onstott Morteza Aleali, owner of the Herbs and Acupuncture shop on Northwest Couch Street in Chinatown, has had to battle a closed sidewalk on his block for nearly two years because the neighboring Sinnott House has been crumbling. 

Fixing the Sinnott House will cost $100,000? (Blocked out in Chinatown, Jan. 20)

Are you saying that there are no seismic upgrades necessary? Maybe there was an unintended decimal shift - $100,000 won't get one pass the permit stage. And it isn't easy to get by the permit stage because it is a historic landmark. This is another one of the many buildings in Old Town that needs fixing and hasn't been because of the cost; and part of that cost is related to its historic status.

It is still in an urban renewal area, but one wonders if that will help now. Old Town's urban renewal plan - wait for the tremors.

Larry Norton

Northwest Portland

Fines won't disappear with time

I am not sure whether to laugh or cry for the owner and investor of a building (the Sinnott House) in Portland when I read this quote: 'Until then, the fence stays and (Kecia Nathan) plans on contacting the Bureau of Development Services in hopes that the monthly fines will be discontinued' (Blocked out in Chinatown, Jan. 20).

Somewhere, there is a mad Greek scratching his head at such musings.

Geoff Rode

Southeast Portland

Restitution can be paid in service

Understandably, some people simply cannot pay the amount of money in restitution ($77 million unpaid, Jan. 27).

There's no excuse, however, for the lack of personal accountability at hand. Last I checked, community service doesn't cost much.

Put 'em to work if they can't pay in full - $77 million can be paid off in sweat.

Wes Shoger

Beaverton

Parole officers need to step it up

What percent of a paycheck is garnished ($77 million unpaid, Jan. 27)? Why doesn't the parole officer set in motion garnishment?

Obviously, weekend community service isn't being used, or working? Why not?

Is it because the parole officer may have to do a little extra work? Seems like the breakdown begins with the initial face-to-face encounter by the parole officer and the miscreant.

Dan Maher

Southeast Portland

Kyron outcome will be negative

With a heavy heart, I too think the outcome will be negative (Sources Say • Kyron's case takes grim turn, Feb. 3).

Someone took this child and caused intentional harm and I do believe it was at the stepmother's doing. We may never know what happened to Kyron and worse, no one will be prosecuted.

I pray that the truth will be known and justice for Kyron will prevail.

Ilene Hays

Waldorf, Maryland

Kyron story is a cautionary tale

This is so sad but I knew it instinctively all along - I always had a little hope left that Kyron was still alive though (Sources Say • Kyron's case takes grim turn, Feb. 3).

Now it seems this whole situation will become a future cautionary tale: If you suspect your significant other is in trouble psychologically or with drugs/alcohol, get them help right away and do not trust them around your child. Also, from what I have read, Kyron should have been listened to a little more carefully - it seems he was trying to tell people he was unhappy.

May his soul rest with God and the person who committed this heinous crime be brought to justice.

Brenda Haffner

Monroe, Wash.

Missing boy is loved by many

This is going to make many people very sad - in Portland, in Oregon, in this country and around the world - if it's true (Sources Say • Kyron's case takes grim turn, Feb. 3).

For the past eight months, I have been following this case and posting about it in my blog. I am amazed not just by the amount of hits that I have gotten, but where they have originated from. People are concerned about Kyron Horman in the U.K., Japan, Germany, Australia, etc. Kyron is a very famous and much-loved little boy.

My sincere prayer of resolution and consolation goes out to little Kyron and those who truly love him.

Ruth Rader

Bozeman, Mont.

Justice will prevail for Kyron

The very thought of an adult killing a child is so offensive that it literally staggers the imagination (Sources Say • Kyron's case takes grim turn, Feb. 3).

If Terri Moulton Horman killed Kyron, she knows it and has to live with it every hour of every day.

Does it bother her? Is she such a psychopathic killer that there is no memory of this child that she took to school that morning? Is there no regret? No guilt? Whatever the case, our system of justice will eventually bring her and/or anyone else involved in this unspeakable crime, to stand before a jury. It can't happen soon enough.

Doug Stanley

Tigard