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City population is up – what will that mean?

City population is up - what will that mean?

By REBECCA RANDALL

Staff Reporter

The U.S. Census Bureau recently released population data on redistricting to the Oregon Legislature. The Legislature will look at changing district boundaries to reflect population changes over the last 10 years.

The 2010 census population of Lake Oswego is 36,619, which is up 3.8 percent from the 2000 census figure of 35,278. Clackamas County had 338,391 residents in 2000 and claimed 375,992 residents in 2010 for a growth rate of 11.1 percent.

Lake Oswego is the 13th most populous place in the state. Limited data is available about the unincorporated areas of Lake Oswego. Due to the city's approach to annexation there is a very disjointed city boundary.

As it is, the city must still do public facilities planning for all land within its urban services boundary - a line drawn by Clackamas County. There are more than 1,100 acres of unincorporated land within the urban services boundary. Past projections have calculated that the land boosts Lake Oswego's city population to a community population of about 42,700. More data on the total community population will be released over the next few months.

The face of Lake Oswego is still predominantly white with 89.3 percent of citizens reporting to be white. The number is however, slightly down from 2000, when 91.1 percent of Lake Oswegans reported to be white.

Asians account for 5.6 percent of the population with 2,056 reporting, and those who are two or more races make up 3 percent of the population with 1,087 reporting. Following those populations, people reported to be (in order): Black or African American; some other race; American Indian and Alaska native; or native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander.

The census also reported that there are 1,356 Hispanics or Latinos of any race living in Lake Oswego. The number reporting in 2000 was only 820. Americans who have an origin in one of the Hispanic countries of Latin America or Spain are counted as an ethnicity rather than a race due to the diverse racial backgrounds of Hispanics and Latinos.

In 2010, the census counted 16,995 housing units in Lake Oswego, which had a vacancy rate of 6.5 percent.