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Letters, Dec. 31

It's a miserable life

In response to Mr. Brookhart's letter in The Post on Dec. 12: Yes, how dare anyone hope and pray for world peace? We should all hold ourselves to such high standards of hatefulness. Shame on me for feeling goodwill toward my fellow man. Yes, you have convinced me, Mr. Brookhart, it is a miserable life!

BARBARA KIM

Sandy


Part of the 'mob'

I am proud to be part of the 'mob' which Mr. Bill Brookhart finds so objectionable, and so happy to not believe and support the lies and misrepresentations of the current administration. Every Friday afternoon, rain or shine, from 4 p.m. to darkness, we stand across from Fred Meyer displaying our signs urging the end of the Iraq occupation. I find it extremely sad that someone, regardless of their political orientation, would use the word 'mob' to characterize Americans exercising their constitutional right of free expression.

Mr. Brookhart also uses the world 'nauseating' to describe the reaction of the motorists passing by our vigil. I can only say that, sure, we receive some taunts, but they are outnumbered by hundreds of motorists waving and honking their support. What's really nauseating is the American and Iraqi lives lost in this invasion and occupation without end.

We will persist in our efforts, meager though they may be in the final analysis, until the needless deaths of our brave troops stop.

We would be pleased to have you join us.

MARK ANDERSON

Sandy


Brookhart way off base

Speaking of 'most observers in our area,' if Mr. Bill Brookhart of Sandy believes that he is among them by being nauseated at the sight of weekly peace protesters, this supposition may be added to a veritable list of his delusions.

To address some of the others, may I ask what, how and why 3,900 American casualties in Iraq has anything whatsoever to do with 'defending justice and liberty'? This war has been patently unjust from the outset, from the lies and half-truths that enabled our country to invade a sovereign nation with no designs on our territory (the very idea was and is still ludicrous), in flagrant defiance of international law. And do I need to call attention to the despicable behavior of our agencies toward prisoners of this conflict for which I shall be forever ashamed?

And what in heaven's name has liberty to do with arbitrary suspension of habeas corpus and spying on our own citizens? If I had never read George Orwell, I wonder if I could possibly know where to go with such absurdities! A mind must be broken!

The issue of abortion Brookhart brings forward is more complex and squeezes apples with oranges. I've never met anyone who advocates killing helpless children for convenience, other than an administration in Washington that actually does! What else can one call the decision to drop bombs on a population and then invade their country to secure the oil there and in the wider region? That's right, Mr. Brookhart, if this was about justice and liberty, what's keeping us out of the Sudan, the Congo, Indonesia, Egypt, Biafra, North Korea and Myanmar, for just a short list?

A woman's right to choose is a difficult and painful proposition for anyone to consider besides being such an entirely different issue. But since it's on the table, for me, the ultimate consideration is liberty of women as contrasted with the oppression of theocracy. I say, you invoke liberty, Mr. Brookhart? Then keep the august power of the state out of our bedrooms! Solutions exist for this problem, but your church probably ignores them if it does not condemn them.

Next, Mr. Brookhart, like Chicken Little for George, runs white-eyed, screaming helter-skelter through 'buildings, schools, roads, bridges, factories, dams, utilities, ports and other targets in this country.' This is simply not sensible. It is like the raving of a dangerous, fearful lunatic. I have much more faith in the ability of the citizens in a truly free republic to manage a reasonable defense of the borders in worthy proportion to an actual threat. To me, the threat we now face here in America is the fact that some people continue to believe this war in Iraq has anything to do with justice and liberty.

EDWARD DeVITO

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