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Letters, Jan. 23

'White trash' school 'embarrassing'

I have heard Sandy High School being called a 'white trash school' from people around here.

When I walk into Sandy High, I see numerous things wrong with our school. The carpets are old and ripped, then taped back down. That embarrasses me. Another thing that embarrasses me are the ceiling tiles. They are moldy and disgusting looking. When I was in my 'fitness for life' class one day playing dodge ball, a tile fell on a guy's head. He didn't get hurt, but he very well could have. It's extremely dangerous not to have a stable ceiling.

A few months ago, we got new portables outside the school for a few more classes. That's great and all, but the main reason we get called 'white trash' is because of the two white portables in front of our school. It looks ridiculous. Instead of continuing to add goofy-looking things like that, shouldn't we build a bigger and better school?

When I say bigger, I mean bigger. Our school is extremely small for the number of kids who go here. The school is made to fit around 900 kids, and we have 1,500 or so. The hallways are always uncomfortable and crowded.

When you go in the cafeteria, the lines are always really long, so I don't bother waiting in them because then I won't have time to eat and get to class on time. So in order to buy food, my only other option is to leave campus. That's what I usually do.

There are so many problems with Sandy High School that need to be fixed. A new school will make things better, easier and much safer for everyone.

SARA COOK

Sandy

Editor's note: A slight correction … According to recent estimates, Sandy High School has about 1,400 students, and is operating at about 200 students over capacity.


Malone's tone disingenuous

The mayor's four Cs are change, cooperation, challenge and creativity. To me, they stand for crap, crap, crap, crap.

Linda Malone says, 'We're not a static city. We're transforming and changing. The key is to change and grow while still maintaining the characteristics and atmosphere that drew us here in the first place.'

That's what 'Annex Malone' says. It wasn't so long ago she was saying, 'Keep Sandy a small town,' and that's what it was 20 years ago when I came here. Then, you knew your neighbor and they knew you, and they would give you a hand and they knew your first name. But not now, not anymore - maybe if you live in the mayor's neighborhood next to the Cleavers with the manicured lawns and perfect streets.

My street has not been repaved since I had the place built some 20 years ago. Where did the 2003 gas tax money go? It sure didn't get spent over here. The mayor says, 'It doesn't matter if we're a city of 3,000 or 7,000; we're still Sandy' - if you're in the Twilight Zone.

'(We) get what's best for our local citizens,' she says. How would they know? They never ask us, they just want more taxes. They love to spend our money, and the more you give them the more they want. They don't know what a budget is. If you don't have the money, you don't spend it.

And it does make a lot of difference what the population is and how many houses there are and what they look like, and you would know that, Mayor, if you had any intention of keeping the city of Sandy a small town. You've sold out, and we know to whom.

STEPHEN THORSTAD

Sandy


Dare to question protesters?

If you disagree with local war protesters or their Oregon Trail Democrat supporters, expect to get ridiculous accusations that you want to deny their free speech rights. Such false accusation is a tactic used to quiet anyone who dares question the protesters. Consider recent letters to The Sandy Post castigating me for my comments regarding their war protest activities.

One writer's personal attack suggests I be ignored in future public meetings in Sandy because I disagree with protesters. So much for gracious free speech sentiment from Oregon Trail Demos and/or war protesters, toward those who would openly disagree with them.

Also, I find it humorous that these war protesters suggest polling data results should silence all negative discussion of their protest activities. We wish protesters well in their efforts to trump reason and logic with manipulative polling questions and results.

Concerning incessant incantations by protesters that the president and Congress deliberately lied to start an unjustified war, most of us (who by the way are praying for peace and quick end to this war) are considerably disgusted by such dishonest misrepresentation of truth.

Unfortunately war protesters are not required to tell the 'whole truth' with all the facts, in the correct order of occurrence and context. With much license, protesters exercise convenient selective memory and creative rhetoric.

BILL BROOKHART

Sandy


Sandy's centennial already happened

I read with interest and concern that Mayor Linda Malone thinks the 'founding' of Sandy began in 1911. The centennial of Sandy's incorporation may occur in 2011; Sandy's founding centennial was declared to be Feb. 13, 1973, by the City Council and mayor more than 35 years ago. Is Mayor Malone suggesting that her predecessor of 35 years ago was wrong?

It has been widely accepted that a town's 'founding' is determined by when the United States government charters a post office in a community, unless that occurs after incorporation, or the presentation of a charter by the state.

Recent centennials which adhered to that long-held and recognized tradition in Clackamas County were celebrated by Oregon City, Clackamas, Eagle Creek, Linn City, Milwaukie, Molalla, Oswego, Beavercreek, Boring, Oak Grove, Pompeii and Welches.

Whoever constitutes the Sandy City Council on Feb. 13, 2023, should be granted the honor of organizing and presiding over Sandy's sesquicentennial!

BILL WHITE

Brightwood