Featured Stories

Other Pamplin Media Group sites

Hazelia Field at Luscher Farm a big hit

Artificial turf field provides for easy upkeep and a number of different uses
by: Sam Bennett, 
Hazelia Field at Luscher Farm can accomodate a number of different sporting events.

Local teams are already taking to the new multi-use field at Hazelia Field at Luscher Farm.

Construction is complete on the field, though crews are still putting the finishing touches on the project. Some pathway lighting, parking lot paving and installation of pavers remains, but the field itself is attracting local sports teams.

The field can accommodate soccer, football, men's and women's lacrosse and baseball. Since those sports are usually played at different times of the year, the field will probably be used year-round.

Gary Evans, assistant director at Lake Oswego Parks and Recreation, said the field is made from plastic fibers and ground-up rubber.

'It has excellent lasting capacity and the drainage provides for quick dispursement of water,' Evans said.

Artificial turf fields are 'tremendously helpful' in the winter because they keep players from using natural grass fields when the grass is seeding, Evans said.

The new field is equipped with computer-controlled lights. The city's Park and Recreation department can turn them on by scheduling on the Internet. If teams finish up early and want the lights turned off, they can call a toll-free number and enter a password.

The park's hours will be 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Most local leagues will be able to use the field for free, once they pay a seasonal fee for using local fields. There will be a charge of $25 to $60 an hour to groups that don't meet residency requirements and an additional $10-an-hour fee for the lights. Reservations can be made through the Parks and Recreation Department.

Adjacent to the play field are two off-leash dog parks. One is 1.6 acres and one is 1.1 acres. The second park will be for dogs that are less rowdy.

The dog parks are expected to open in April. Once the soil warms, the grass will fill in, according to Jerry Knipple, special projects director for the city.