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City issues first ever annual report

Last year may best be remembered for the battle over the city's purchase of the Safeco Building. Or the city's plan to build the $100 million sewer interceptor project.

But while tempers flared over the wisdom of paying $20 million for Safeco, the day-to-day operations of the city went on.

That's the stuff of the recently released 'Value and Vision,' the city's 2007 annual report.

The report is available at city hall, 380 A Ave. and online at www.ci.oswego.or.us/pubaffairs/news.htm .

This is the first year the city has issued an annual report.

Mayor Judie Hammerstad writes that 'Value and Vision' summarizes 'how the city council has directed your dollars to work for you during the past year and the efforts we have taken to prepare for our successful future.'

The city issued commercial permits valued at $8.4 million, and residential permits valued at $31.2 million. Permit revenue was $1.4 million.

The average permit value for a new single-family residence was about $410,000, down from 2005's high of $550,000.

The city issued 391 building permits, excluding demolition permits and interior-only permits. Residents filed 1,034 tree removal applications. The city approved six subdivisions and granted four conditional use permits.

Police stats included 576 crash responses, 159 DUII arrests, 383 vehicles impounded and 32,587 patrol call responses. There were 628 part 1 crimes (including aggressive assault, robbery, rape) and 1,241 part-II crimes (simple assault, forgery/counterfeit, fraud).

In the area of finance, the report said property taxes were the largest source of revenues, at 39 percent. The second largest was sales and services, at 23 percent.

Public safety uses the biggest chunk of property tax dollars, at 57 percent, with parks and recreation at 17 percent and bonded debt at 13 percent.

In engineering, the city installed 24,000 feet of new or rehabilitated sanitary sewer pipe and 7,000 feet of storm drain pipe.

The biggest sewer project, of course, is yet to come as the city prepares for the $100 million sewer interceptor project. The lake drawdown will begin in the fall of 2009 and last six to seven months.