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Weekend!Life: Your guide to the next 72 hours

Seek and find
by: COURTESY OF THE OREGON ZOO, The Easter Bunny even remembers polar bears at the Oregon Zoo, who will get treats and toys this holiday weekend.

'RabbitRomp'

Every 20 minutes, kids ages 3 to 10 years old can hunt for candy eggs and prizes during the Oregon Zoo's Saturday romp. Toddlers (age 2 and under) get their own treasure hunt.

Afterward, families can watch as sea otters, elephants and polar bears receive some holiday treats as well.

- Lee Williams

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 22, Oregon Zoo, 4001 S.W. Canyon Road, 503-226-1561, www.oregonzoo.org, $9.75, seniors $8.25, ages 3 to 11 $6.75, ages 2 and under free

Oregon Garden Egg Hunt

Fearless egg-hunters up to 12 years old are invited to scour the grounds of the Oregon Garden in celebration of Easter.

Plastic eggs filled with candy provide the bounty for the pint-size treasure seekers Saturday. Some will win grand prize baskets, and there are coloring sheets provided for all participants after the two scheduled hunts.

- LW

Noon and 1 p.m. Saturday, March 22, the Oregon Garden, 879 W. Main St., Silverton, 503-874-8100, $5, ages 8 to 17 and seniors $4

'Ken Kesey Remembered'

The life of the revered novelist will be celebrated in the latest installment of the Oregon Cultural Heritage Commission's 'Discovering Oregon Originals' series.

Kesey's best known works are 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest' and 'Sometimes a Great Notion.' The latter, which was made into a 1971 film, will make its stage debut when Portland Center Stage presents a world-premiere production in two weeks.

Guests at the free lecture and discussion will include writer

Mark Christensen, poet Walt Curtis, and Kesey friends

and associates.

- Eric Bartels

7 p.m. Friday, March 21, First Unitarian Church, 1011 S.W. 12th Ave., 503-228-6389, www.firstunitarianportland.org, free

Justin Townes Earle

When your father is the legendary singer-songwriter Steve Earle and you're named after the late, great Townes Van Zandt, you've got a lot to live up to.

Justin Townes Earle delivers the goods. His forthcoming album, 'The Good Life,' is classic Americana - an easygoing assortment of confident, country-tinged songs that more than lives up to his pedigree and sounds like it's coming from a much older soul.

- Barbara Mitchell

9 p.m. Friday, March 21, Doug Fir Lounge, 830 E. Burnside St., 503-231-9663, $10

SATURDAY

'A River and Sound Review'

The creation of a Puyallup, Wash., school teacher, this literary entertainment show features guests - in this case, Portland writer Brian Doyle and essayist Ann Whitfield Powers - as well as live music, comedy and a discussion of Walt Whitman's 'Leaves of Grass.'

Think variety show goes on the road, but brainier and without the white three-piece suits.

- EB

7 p.m. Saturday, March 22, Mississippi Studios, 3939 N. Mississippi Ave., 503-288-3895, www.riverandsoundreview.org, $8

'Meet the Browns' (PG-13)

Tyler Perry's comedies may not generate raves from picky critics or awards during Oscar season.

But the writer-director (and the force behind the TBS 'House of Payne' series) makes people- real, ticket-purchasing people- laugh.

Perry's last effort, 'Why Did I Get Married?,'topped the box office in its first week and has raked in more than Oscar contenders 'Michael Clayton' or 'There Will Be Blood,' and it's outperformed Ben Stiller's last comedy.

Take that, Hollywood.

Perry's newest, 'Meet the Browns,' based on the play Perry wrote in 2004, could be a combination of 'Meet the Fockers,' and TV's 'Good Times.'

The movie finds Angela Bassett as a single mom, newly unemployed, who rediscovers her family, rooted in Georgia.

It's real laughs, for real people.

- LW

Starts Friday, March 21, various theaters