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When the LOIS project gets going, what happens next?

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The following is a continuation of information being provided by the city of Lake Oswego about the Lake Oswego Interceptor System. Today's format comes in a question-and-answer form.

ASK LOIS: What will happen to my sewer service when LOIS construction begins?

The good news is that you will have the same reliable service you have always had. The Lake Oswego Interceptor Sewer (LOIS) has been designed so that essential sewer service will continue uninterrupted throughout the project. Thanks to 'bypass pumping,' residents can go about their daily lives with no sewer interruption.

Bypass pumping will be needed during the lake drawdown work as manholes are being worked on. The contractor will disconnect the existing sewer line and pump the contents to a separate bypass sewer line. This allows the contractor to upgrade an existing sewer manhole or install or connect a new segment of pipe to a manhole while allowing sewer flows to continue.

Here is a simplified explanation of the bypass pumping process:

First, the contractor fuses or bolts together a short suction pipe that goes into a manhole upstream of the manhole where work is being done.

A long discharge pipe is fused or bolted together and goes into a manhole downstream of the work area.

The piping is attached to the pumps.

When work is completed on the manhole, the sewer is reconnected.

The bypass piping is flushed with clean water and disassembled.

Jane Heisler is the Communications Director for the LOIS Project.