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Search for adrenaline drives star

George resident hunts for thrills in front of camera
by: ALANA KANSAKU-SARMIENTO Bethy Rossos outside her home in George, where she lives with her parents, older sister and two pet goats.

Bethy Rossos is a hunter. Sometimes her tools include a bow and arrow, but they can just as often include a pair of inline skates, a helmet or a compass.

Rossos, a 26-year-old George resident and Damascus Christian High School graduate, is the star of 'Adrenaline Hunter,' a reality show airing every Wednesday at 7 p.m. on Comcast SportsNet. The show centers around Rossos and her thirst for thrills, following her on outrageous first-time encounters with experiences that get your heart pumping, including boar-hunting, playing roller derby, skydiving and cougar-tracking.

'I think I was born this way,' said Rossos of her adrenaline-laced lifestyle. 'I was kind of stubborn and ornery, such a tomboy, always outside playing with my sisters.'

Rossos says that she and sibling, all born a year apart, have been into hunting, fishing, camping and sports for all their life.

'My parents had a two-sport rule,' said Rossos, who played basketball, soccer, volleyball and ran track throughout her school years. 'I hated that, otherwise I'd have done five all year. It was probably good for me.'

Rossos won the right to host her own reality show by being the last contestant standing on another one, called 'Wanted: Adventure Woman.'

The reality show, which was filmed in North Plains, Ore., and aired on Comcast SportsNet, put 12 female finalists to the test by leading them through a number of physical challenges. 'Adrenaline Hunter' fans everywhere can thank Rossos' uncle for getting her to audition in the first place.

'(He) said, 'You need to apply for this. It's right up your alley.' I didn't really want to, but ended up applying and, by the grace of God, made it through,' she said. 'It's been an adventure.'

Rossos said the audition process seemed like a mix between an 'American Idol' and 'Survivor' audition. After weeks of tests and waiting, the group was narrowed down to the final 12.

'I couldn't believe it,' Rossos said. 'If eight months ago someone told me I would (have my own show), I would have been like, 'What are you talking about?'

'I can say This is what I think I'm going to be doing in the future, and God can have a totally different plan,' she said. 'That's just how it happens.'

So far, roller derby has been Rossos' favorite 'Adrenaline Hunter' episode, for the simple reason that it was so challenging.

'I've been playing sports forever, and I usually pick them up pretty quickly,' Rossos said. 'I rollerbladed in elementary school, but that's it. People said it would be just like getting back on a bike, but it was nothing like getting back on a bike. I've never been in so much pain after playing a sport.'

After a bruising rodeo episode in which Rossos was taught how to steer wrestle, or 'bulldog,' she commented that the bar has been raised to a whole new height when it comes to her fear level.

'I haven't ridden a horse since high school, and then I had to be able to rope a cow going full speed,' she said.

'I've pushed myself more than I ever have before. I'm not really a fearful type of person anyway, but with some of the stuff I do, it makes everything else seem not even scary at all.'

When Rossos isn't off filming scenes for 'Adrenaline Hunter' - or doing yard work at her parents' house - she's probably coaching track at Barlow High School.

'The kids do exactly what I always tell them to do now,' Rossos said. 'They were pretty good for me before, 'cause I'm kind of a strict teacher, but they don't even question what I tell them to do now … It's kind of nice.'

Rossos, who also coached soccer for two years in Estacada, has been working with kids consistently since she graduated from high school in 2003.

'Right now, I've been blessed to have kids look up to me - put me on a pedestal - and I've been able to use that as a way to really make a difference in their lives,' Rossos said. 'I don't know how long that will last, but I'm trying to use that while I can.'