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Guerilla Girls slate performance at Pacific

Lecture --Female artists talk about inequities in American culture on April 5

Sex, lies and moral perversion are not the purview of politicians and late night TV hosts alone. Sexism, racism and corruption exist in art, film and popular culture, too, according to the Guerilla Girls, a group of New York-based women artists who will bring their message to Pacific University next month.

The Guerrilla Girls were founded in 1985, when a group of women artists assumed the names of dead women artists and wore gorilla masks in public to conceal their identities and dramatize the issues of injustice. Since then, their numbers have grown and Guerrilla Girls travel the world as feminist masked avengers, working collectively and anonymously, talking, producing posters, billboards, public actions, books and other projects to make feminism and social change funny and fashionable.

Through the use of provocative texts, visuals and humor they expose inequity in the art world, film, politics and pop culture, and create plays, performances, workshops, street theater and residency programs to dramatize their message.

They are authors of stickers, billboards, posters and other projects (including a large-scale installation for the 2005 Venice Biennale) and several books including 'The Guerrilla Girls' Bedside Companion to the History of Western Art,' 'Bitches, Bimbos and Ballbreakers: The Guerrilla Girls' Illustrated Guide to Female Stereotypes' and 'The Guerrilla Girls' Art Museum Activity Book.' In their presentations they talk about their work, their philosophy of activism, and their campaign against the lack of ethics in the art world.

Guerrilla Girls have appeared at more than 90 universities and museums in recent years, and been featured in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Mother Jones and Artforum; on NPR, the BBC and CBC; and in many art and feminist texts.

The Guerilla Girls' Pacific University visit is sponsored by the Center for Women and Gender Equity as part of Four Weeks of Women: Women's History Month.