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Get your motor running with the Motorcycle Mama

by: Vern Uyetake, 
Sandi Serling, Lake Oswego, is a relatively new convert to motorcycles and recently was featured in two magazines for her motorcycle riding. She is shown above on her Yamaha V Star 1100 and below in front of her home.

Sandi Serling is always looking for her next adventure. On her 46th birthday, she went skydiving. And shortly thereafter, she decided she wanted to top that adventure.

At the age of 13, Serling visited her older sister in college and had the opportunity to ride on the back of a motorcycle for the first time and she never forgot that experience.

'I remember feeling this great sense of freedom and the memory stuck with me,' Serling said.

Through the years, the Lake Oswego resident has had friends with bikes but, at the age of 47, she figured out what her next thrill would be: Serling purchased a Yamaha V Star 1100.

'I kind of have a love affair with that bike. I knew I was going to buy it one mile into the test drive,' said Serling, who is the owner of Serling and Associates, Inc., Media Relations.

Since that test drive, she hasn't looked back. Serling quickly enrolled in a safety course and now, four years later, riding has become one of her passions.

'I wish I had been doing it longer. I'm finding that I just want to ride as much as possible,' said Serling, who has a 21-year-old daughter and an 18-year-old son.

And now, on her bike, Serling is constantly finding new adventures and discovering towns and places she probably never would have otherwise.

'You experience places you wouldn't in a car. I've gone to a bunch of small towns. When you're on a bike you want to be in the country because you feel the intensity of the air and the traffic around you. I just ride and take roads that look interesting,' Serling said.

And Oregon is, perhaps, one of best places in the country to experience life on the road.

'I feel so fortunate to live here. The state has such a diverse terrain so you can experience everything from the desert to forests, magnificent mountains, rivers and oceans,' Serling said.

While Oregon is ideal for day trips, Serling also has a penchant for longer travels on her motorcycle. For her 50th birthday she drove with friends to Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. and drove back through the Olympic Peninsula.

On a recent trip to the Oregon Coast, she was followed by Coastal Living magazine and was featured in its March edition with pictures of her at Arch Cape.

Serling was also featured on the cover of Woman Rider Magazine.

When she rides around Lake Oswego, Serling is constantly fielding questions and receiving compliments because she is not what immediately comes to mind when one thinks of a biker.

But a more diverse group of individuals is starting to take up the hobby.

'I've seen people riding from every walk of life and from every age group. It's a bond, like anything. You can relate to people who have that same passion you do. I've had great conversations with people I might not have in another situation,' Serling said.

Serling has immersed herself in the culture that comes with owning a motorcycle. She is starting to learn how to fix and maintain her bike, although she admits that some of her friends are much more skilled at it.

'I am constantly learning and always looking to challenge myself,' said Serling, whose father's cousin was the Twilight Zone's creator, Rod Serling.

When she is on her bike, she also does things that would be out of the ordinary at home. Serling is avid about working out and eating healthy but, on a day trip, she loves stopping off for a burger and fries.

There are certainly many more trips ahead for Serling. She hopes to drive to the Calgary Stampede in the future and, later this month, she is planning on shipping her bike to Las Vegas and then driving around Arizona with friends.

'It's all about the journey for me. I honestly didn't know that this would capture my heart the way it has. Now I try to live by my new philosophy, which is to grab life by the throttle and not look back,' Serling said.