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Medical examiner identifies two bodies found in Willamette River

One is that of Lake Oswego chiropractor Michael Kennedy; the other is of an Oregon City fisherman

Michael Kennedy, a long-time Lake Oswego chiropractor, was found dead on the bank of the Willamette River Tuesday.

Kennedy, 53, owned Kennedy Chiropractic at 155 B Ave.

Lake Oswego Police said they believe there was 'no criminal element involved in this incident.'

Another body found at almost the same time Tuesday morning, but across the river, was that of Richard Ellis, 51, of Oregon City, who has been missing since he fell from a boat while fishing with friends on the river on Thanksgiving.

Both were found within an hour of each other by boaters. The Clackamas County Medical Examiner's Office identified them around 1 p.m. Wednesday.

Kennedy was believed to be jogging when he went missing.

Kayakers found Kennedy on the Lake Oswego side of the river, near ChristieCare (formerly the Christie School) in Maryl-hurst.

Ellis was found a couple hundred yards upstream on the Milwaukie side by a boater who was watching the Kennedy body recovery.

Kennedy, who lived alone in an apartment on Third Street, was last seen by his fiancee the evening of June 20.

Kennedy was divorced and had two sons, according to his office assistant, Sharon Hudson.

She said the clinic at 155 B Ave. has been closed this week and his patients have been referred to a local chiropractor.

'He was totally into his patients and didn't like taking time off,' said Hudson, noting that Kennedy was an avid jogger and fly fisherman. 'He cared about every patient who came in. They were not just somebody to pay the bills.'

Kennedy's practice offered chiropractic services, but he also had a thriving business practicing meridian therapy. Kennedy used an electronic stimulator to balance patients' energy flows, treating everything from insomnia to depression and skin disorders, Hudson said.

'Everybody was just amazed and happy and people would call in to say how wonderful they felt,' she said. 'I have probably 100 success stories written by patients.'

Hudson met Kennedy through her parents, who were long-time patients of his in Lake Oswego. She began working with Kennedy on B Avenue in September.

'Working for him was amazing,' she said Tuesday. 'He's very sensitive to people and cares about everybody. People like him don't belong in this world. He was too good for it. I just miss him and want him to be back.'