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Schmitz made Lake Oswego a better place

To the Editor:

Bravo to Doug Schmitz:

Like many, we lament his departure, but celebrate our very good fortune for his long service to the community.

As long-time residents, with service on both commissions and city council, we have had a keen interest in Lake Oswego affairs, and have marveled at the transition, year by year, to a far more vibrant community and a top notch place to live.

The press has observed that Doug Schmitz's departure occurs at a time of daunting challenges. (Our view is that, in the years ahead, Lake Oswego, like most other communities, will face a series of challenges, many infrastructure-related). One such contemporary issue, arguably the centerpiece of community dialogue, is the disposition of the Safeco property. This, we suspect, with proper perspective will be considered visionary and may - if implemented - provide an enduring legacy.

We hold dear the notion of fiscal responsibility, and, yes, we belong to the ranks of retirees; but it seems to us that the Safeco site, in addition to consideration as a community center, merits evaluation as the location for both a new city hall and library.

Most of us are adverse to change, but communities do evolve and the continuing give and take offers solutions to create a better place to live. In this regard, Doug Schmitz has performed admirably, together with our elected leadership. As we see it, his consensus-building techniques have been quite remarkable and his departure is our collective loss. Consolation lies in the notion that new leadership, as he suggests, leads to renewal both for community and self.

Beyond the aforementioned issues, there remains, as always, much to be done by his successor. We would, for instance, argue for more attention to environmental stewardship and quality of life issues.

But irrespective of the next agenda, Doug Schmitz has made Lake Oswego a far better place to call home.

Janice and Tony Marquis

Lake Oswego

'Once' the musical is worth seeing

To the Editor:

Go see 'Once' the musical now playing at our own Lake Theater.

We are lucky that our little theater's owner has such good taste in movies so we can catch this on a big screen and see and hear this beautiful movie in full glory.

It takes place in Dublin, Ireland. It is not a musical in the usual sense. The main characters are musicians and songwriters and the songs come in as a part of their lives.

The song lyrics inform both the viewer and the characters in the movie of their motivations and histories. My daughter came home from the movie and promptly bought the soundtrack online.

Amy Marks

Portland

Measure 49 fixes some of Measure 37's problems

To the Editor:

(This is an open letter to Carolyne Jones, who wrote a citizen's view in the July 26 Lake Oswego Review).

Measure 37 passed because voters were not aware of the dreadful outcome that would soon follow; voters were deceived by the vagueness of Measure 37. While property rights are important, we need to get our priorities set straight.

You have overlooked the serious threat Measure 37 poses on the future sustainability of Oregon's natural land. Measure 37 claims threaten to clear-cut and develop nearly one million acres of Oregon's most beautiful and pristine natural forests, farmlands and wine country. If we allow this land to be destroyed now for a temporary profit, the state will surely suffer in the long run when there are no longer resources from which to profit. The opportunity is in our hands to find a balance between property rights and nature conservation.

The solution is Measure 49, which will limit the amount of land that can be allotted for the development of subdivisions. Measure 49, which will appear on the ballot in November, will maintain the value of property rights while fine-tuning the extent to which development may occur.

Camille Rasmussen

Lake Oswego

Now here's an interesting thought for the city

To the Editor:

Here's a thought for the city of Lake Oswego:

Sell the Safeco property and grant gambling rights to the Confederated Tribes in exchange for them financing the 'Intercepto'' project.

Chris A. Turley

Lake Oswego