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Audobon Society has good coyote information

To the Editor:

I recall vividly the first time I saw a coyote in my neighborhood (about five years ago). I was walking - alone - in Cooks' Butte Park. We eyed one another -keeping our distances - and then went on our individual ways. As a professional wildlife biologist, I knew there was little to fear, and I enjoyed watching the behavior of this interesting animal. At the same time, I couldn't help but feel a bit of caution. Since then, I - like others in Lake Oswego and elsewhere -have seen or heard coyotes.

Therefore, I read with interest, the article by Cliff Newell ('Well-fed coyotes on the prowl') in the Nov. 22 Review. It did not include, however, reference to one of best sources of information about coyotes in urban areas. The Audubon Society of Portland has an excellent Web site and brochure about living with urban coyotes. It includes information about the natural history of coyotes; laws regarding capturing, relocating, and killing coyotes; and information about living in harmony with them. The Audubon Web site is: www.audobonportland.org . Look under 'Living With Wildlife' and then 'Urban Coyotes.' You can download a printable brochure, or request one by calling 503-292-0304.

Claire A. Puchy

Lake Oswego

'Legalization' seems to be the right way to go in drug war

To the Editor:

The Review's editorial, 'Meth Fight Must Go To The Source In Mexico' (Nov. 29) is appreciated. However there are ways of dealing with the meth problem that too often go unmentioned.

While you rightly point out the decrease in domestic 'mom and pop' meth labs as laudable the point about production shifting and moving to Mexico was incomplete. In drug policy reform circles that shift in production is known as the balloon theory. If you take an inflated balloon and squeeze it it bulges. Push that bulge down and another pops up somewhere else.

The drug war is but a new-fangled version of Prohibition and just as with alcohol Prohibition, is a policy that can never succeed. One of the greatest deterrents to drug abuse (which is a separate from drug use) is education. Prison is not an effective deterrent nor an effective rehabilitation model. At least not without totally restructuring our prison system.

What Oregon needs is more money for education. To have prison construction and funding now exceeding education spending is ludicrous and counter productive.

If we wish to end the cartels' stranglehold on the production and distribution of illegal drugs we must end Prohibition II and re-legalize all drugs and return addiction as a disorder to be treated by the medical profession.

While the prohibitionists always screech at the word 'legalization' they do so only to deflect attention away from the obvious failure of our War On Drugs (aka Prohibition II).

Allan Erickson

Drug Policy Forum of Oregon

Eugene

Christmas tree farm directions weren't quite accurate

To the Editor:

It seems I didn't get the directions exactly right when I encouraged people to go to Little Z Tree Farm for a righteous organic Christmas tree in (my citizen's view) in last week's Lake Oswego Review. This was my fault, but I'd be most grateful if you would print the (following) correction: From State Street, go south on McVey/Stafford. After the roundabout (near Luscher Farm), watch for gravel driveway on left with small sign for 'Little Z Tree Farm', immediately before Zivney Lane.

Barbara Kelley

Lake Oswego

Amazing moments should

have trigger some thanks

To the Editor:

Mikel Kelly had me going with his 'Just a split second from something' column (in last week's Lake Oswego Review).

We have all had similar experiences and have marveled at the fact that we or our loved ones were here, miraculously, to live another day after surviving a near miss. It was wonderful that Mr. Kelly was somehow detained a few seconds at a green light and escaped being whammed by a person ignoring a red light ... especially when he had neglected to look both ways before he entered the intersection himself.

It was amazing that he came upon his wife in distress minutes after she was run off Interstate 5 by another careless idiot.

It is also amazing that his finger will heal after his own carelessness with a tablesaw.

How can he believe that if 'there is a God, he's either got a nasty sense of humor or he just doesn't like people.' Why is he not thanking God for lovingly watching over him and his wife in their times of distress?

Musa Wolcott

Lake Oswego

Kudos to the city and

'Mike, the sign guy'

To the Editor:

I have been troubled by the negative comments thrown at our city government during the recent election. I have lived in Lake Oswego for 21 years after having lived in some very nice communities in Oregon, California, Ohio and Virginia. Lake Oswego is a model that other cities should seek to emulate and much of the credit goes to the city employees as well as the elected officials. We have many visitors from out of state who praise the summer flower baskets, outdoor art, parks, streets, neighborhoods and many other attributes that make this one of the most desirable cities in Oregon.

This week's storm reinforced my views. During the deluge, I noticed an alarming amount of water around my house, even though it is situated on a sloped grade. I unplugged one of my gutters, and then noticed that most of the water was running down from overflowing gutters on the house above mine. I thought it looked like the drain to the storm sewer was blocked and suggested the neighbor, whose husband is out of town, contact the city to check. Shortly after, 'Mike, the sign guy,' on emergency duty, arrived to investigate. I was outside and explained that I had initiated the call because the neighbor thought the gutters had been maintained. He pointed out that the problem was clearly on private property and seemed to be plugged gutters. Then, much to my surprise, he offered to give me a hand if I wanted to try to fix the problem, which was clearly endangering my property. Although the roof was very high, I quickly grabbed a ladder and with his help we were able to clear the debris in short order.

This example of a helpful public employee doing more than his job requires should not go unnoticed.

Thanks Mike!

Larry Larson

Lake Oswego