Featured Stories

Other Pamplin Media Group sites

Suspects in home invasion arrested

Two Milwaukie men charged with attack in Damascus last week

Two men accused of last week's Damascus home invasion robbery are behind bars.

Investigators from the Clackamas County Major Crimes Unit arrested Beau G. Lyons, 25, of Milwaukie at his home at 1 a.m. Thursday, June 15. He was hiding in bed with his girlfriend at the time, said Detective Jim Strovink, sheriff's office spokesman.

Lyons is being held without bail at the Clackamas County Jail on charges of first-degree robbery, which is a Measure 11 offense; possession of a weapon with intent to use; and unlawful use of a motor vehicle. He also is being held on Multnomah County warrants for possession of a controlled substance and hit and run.

In addition, Lyons faces Clackamas County charges of possession of a controlled substance (due to methamphetamine investigators allegedly found in his possession during the arrest) and violating a restraining order his grandmother has against him, Strovink said.

After arresting Lyons early in the morning, investigators arrested a second suspect that afternoon. Investigators apprehended Landon M. Hanks, 22, at his parents' Milwaukie home at 2:20 p.m. Thursday, June 15, Strovink said. He too is being held without bail at the Clackamas County Jail on charges of first-degree robbery, unlawful use of a firearm and unauthorized use of a motor vehicle.

Both men are suspects in the Friday, June 9, home invasion robbery of a Damascus couple in 16100 block of Southeast Orchard View Lane. Two men armed with pistols forced their way into the house by breaking a sliding glass door. They didn't injure the occupants - a man and woman in their mid and late 60s - but allegedly held them at gunpoint, steal computers and passports and take off in the couple's silver 1999 Chrysler 300.

A girl coming home from school that afternoon spotted the stolen vehicle, which had been abandoned in Clackamas County about 2 miles from the victims' home.

Investigators recovered the passports, but believe the computers were sold or traded for methamphetamine, Strovink said.