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Brought to you by Craig and Jodie - Budget Blinds - WINDOW TREATMENT INSIDER -


BUDGET BLINDS - Craig and JodieStatistics show that an average of one serious injury or fatality occurs each month from blind cord strangulation, both of which are highly avoidable. Cordless window treatments can help make your home a safer place for family and pets. These coverings offer both stylish fashions as well as elimination of cords, allowing you to design as creatively as you would like to.

Wood, faux wood, composite, and honeycomb blinds are just a few of the options that can be made cordless, either through motorization or through wand-controlled operation of louvers, both of which eliminate dangerous, dangling cords.

Shades are the most versatile window treatment, offering a wide variety of styles, color options, fabrics and material choices. Best of all, shades can be cordless or motorized making them ideal window coverings for those with children and/or pets in their homes and/or businesses.

Another option to consider are shutters. Shutters are an incredible window treatment offering clean, crisp lines that complement all décor styles. Shutters are great for arched, rounded, and other unique window shapes that can be a challenge to address. All shutters are custom made from both premium wood and composite materials and they are always cordless.

If you are ready to make your home safer for those you love, call us at 503-590-4333 for a free, in-home consultation. We can translate your safety concerns and style preferences into beautiful custom window coverings for your home.

Budget Blinds

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(503) 590-4333

budgetblinds.com

Brought to you by John Sciarra - Bernard's Garage - AUTO REPAIR INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John Sciarra Before you hit the open road this summer, run through the Bernard’s Garage Road Trip Checklist to lower your chances of getting sidelined by vehicle troubles.

Check your tires: Are your tires at the correct pressure? How much tread do your tires have left? How even is the tire wear? Tires are the most common component of vehicles to fail, so make sure yours are in good condition

Make a road trip playlist: There’s nothing worse than the static of a radio with no service, so burn a CD or create an mp3 playlist with your favorite jams to keep the good times rolling.

Check your different engine fluids: If your transmission fluid isn’t pinkish and almost clear, have it drained and changed out. Check to make sure you have the proper amount of coolant in your cooling system. And change out the oil and air filter in your engine. The improved fuel economy alone is reason enough.

Bring some good snacks: There’s nothing worse than a car full of hungry people yelling at each other. Grab a couple of bottles of water per person, and have foods like trail mix, granola bars, bananas, and jerky handy for when hunger strikes

Stop by Bernard’s Garage: At Bernard’s Garage, vehicle safety is our number one concern. Our knowledgeable and experienced technicians can help ensure your vehicle is running smoothly before your trip. Give us a call, check out the website, or stop by today!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - Automotive INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraWhat’s less fun than getting stuck in a nasty traffic jam? Getting cooked in your car on a hot day.

Summer's here and your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing, the system may need to be recharged. Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as Freon. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on a vehicle’s air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of peripheral components at the same time.

Bernard’s, which has been in business since 1925, services our clients’ foreign, domestic, hybrid and electric cars, trucks, vans and motorcycles. We offer free pickup and delivery for our customers’ convenience.

Plan ahead and stay cool this season!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - Auto Repair INSIDER -


John Sciarra, Bernard's GarageWhat’s less fun than getting stuck in a nasty traffic jam? Getting cooked in your car on a hot day.

Summer's right around the corner and your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing, the system may need to be recharged. Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as Freon. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on a vehicle’s air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of peripheral components at the same time.

Bernard’s, which has been in business since 1925, services our clients’ foreign, domestic, hybrid and electric cars, trucks, vans and motorcycles. We offer free pickup and delivery for our customers’ convenience.

Plan ahead and stay cool this season!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - AUTOMOTIVE INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraSummer's imminent arrival means your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing cold, the system may need to be recharged.

Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as R-12, or Freon, until researchers found it caused ozone depletion. As such, it's illegal to use Freon in vehicles built after 1994. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on an air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of periphery components at the same time.

Why? The easy answer is working on an air conditioning system is about as fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

To avoid draining your refrigerant, removing your compressor, installing a new unit and refilling the system with new cool stuff — only to have you come back in a week and say it's still not cold enough — it makes sense to replace the necessary components.

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by Mike Nielsen of Snap Fitness - FITNESS INSIDER -


SNAP FITNESS - Mike NielsenAs the inspirational saying goes, “Live less out of habit and more out of intent.”

While it’s true that starting a fitness routine can be difficult, I offer the following tips to get you in the gym door and on the road to good health.

Assessment — New SNAP Fitness clients receive a free jump-start session, including consultation with a trainer. The assessment determines the client’s baseline, helps us guide their first steps, and is an opportunity to discuss adding personal training.

Cardio — The national recommendation for exercise for all ages and fitness levels is to get to the gym at least three days per week, and to do a minimum of 30 minutes of cardio per visit. Working out with a friend will make it more fun, help you feel more accountable, help you stay at the gym for more months and achieve a higher level of success.

Strength training is key to replacing fat with muscle, becoming leaner, stronger and improving balance. Do two to three sessions of strength training per week.

Nutritional guidelines — Instead of eating three large meals per day, eat five to six small meals. This will fuel your energy throughout the day and avoid post-meal sluggishness. Also drink 96 ounces of water daily.

Online help — SNAP has a complete online nutritional program and training center. Free with membership, it provides a personalized workout plan, sample menus and a complete library of instruction videos.

Snap Fitness

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/milwaukie-or-97222/1023

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/oregoncity-or-97045/400

Brought to you by Mike Nielsen - Snap Fitness - Fitness INSIDER


Mike Nielsen, Snap FitnessStrength training is an essential part of an exercise program, even for someone who hasn’t been active in a while.

Lifting weights, using weight machines and doing core work increases muscle mass and bone density.

As we age, our muscles deteriorate (called sarcopenia) and bone density decreases.

Research shows that seniors are more susceptible to bone breakage that younger adults. As people age, their metabolism slows down. We are seeing more and more seniors joining gyms.

If we take the average adult between the ages of 40 and 50 and do basic strength-training three to four times per week for 90 days, the outcome can be life-changing.

Here’s a myth-buster: Muscle does NOT weigh more than fat! A pound is a pound. 

Muscle is, however, more dense than body fat and takes up less area than fat. If you were to start an exercise program complete with strength training, you would increase your lean body mass and decrease body fat.

The body takes up less space and metabolism speeds up, resulting in a higher BMR (base metabolic rate, the amount of daily caloric intake needed to maintain LBM and weight.) This reverses sarcopenia and increases bone density.   

Not everyone walks into a gym and knows exactly what to do. Snap gives new members an opportunity to meet with a Certified Personal Trainer, who assesses their body and their goals. 

Let’s get started.

Snap Fitness

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/milwaukie-or-97222/1023

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/oregoncity-or-97045/400

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - AUTO MAINTENANCE INSIDER


John Sciarra, Bernard's GarageRegular maintenance on your car is, quite simply, a good investment.

For example, when you bring your car in for a timing belt — typically needed at 90,000 to 100,000 miles— it costs in the range of $400 to $500. But if it breaks, it might be $1,800 to $2,000.

At our shop, when we do it, we do it right. With the timing belt, we also replace the timing belt tensioner, idler pulleys, camshaft seals, water pump and coolant.

Mileage interval maintenance, which is only done by shops, should be done at 30,000, 60,000 and 90,000 miles.

The ideal scenario is to get the car into the shop about three times per year for inspections, which will find things like rodent damage, which is more common than you might think. It’s mainly squirrels in this area.

An inspection will also uncover leaking coolant or oil, as well as plugged-up air filters. Once a year, you should get a brake inspection.

We do complete automotive repair, including pre-purchase inspections for $150. That’s a comprehensive inspection, which can detect unforeseen problems and save you from buying a compromised vehicle.

Our average cost for an oil change is $38; $58 for a brake inspection.

It’s a small investment. We do it properly and can save you a lot of trouble and expense down the road.

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

bernardsgarage.com/

Mike Nielsen - Snap Fitness - Fitness INSIDER


SNAP FITNESS - Mike Nielsen“We are a friendly, success-oriented fitness center,” says Mike Nielsen, vice president and co-owner of Snap Fitness locations in Oregon City, Milwaukie and Canby. “We’re like the ‘Cheers’ of the gym world, where everybody knows your name.”

Nielsen has been a certified fitness coach for 13 years and has been with Snap for eight years. He says being a fitness coach is all about helping individuals achieve the best version of themselves.

“It’s not just something that’s done at the gym, but it’s a lifestyle change,” he said of Snap. “We focus on not only the physical but also the mental and emotional aspects of everyday life, to make sure we are able to achieve long-term success.”

He says Snap gyms have a family feel and a personal touch.

The gyms are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with monitored access for safety. Snap has more than 1,500 locations nationwide.

The fitness centers offer cardio, personal training, weight-loss programs, a health center, strength training and Olympic lifting. An online web page for members offers nutrition counseling and an online training center.

“Our members are our greatest assets,” Nielsen added. “We do all we can to make sure they have not only the best facility and equipment, but a wonderful experience.”

Snap Fitness

www.snapfitness.com/

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

Canby: 1109 SW 1st Ave.

503-266-5515

Brought to you by John Sciarra - Bernard's Garage - AUTOMOTIVE INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraAfter nearly 100 years of providing excellent full-service automotive repair and maintenance, Bernard’s Garage is a classic Milwaukie institution trusted by generations of customers.

Founded in 1925, old timers and area residents still remember Joe Bernard Sr., who would design and build custom car parts when his customers’ vehicles needed it. Joe Bernard Jr., a former Milwaukie mayor, helped modernize Bernard’s and continued his father’s tradition of excellent customer service.

The current owner, Jim Bernard, another Milwaukie mayor and current Clackamas County commissioner, has computerized Bernard’s—turning his father’s mechanics into today’s technicians.

Besides providing free pickup and delivery, Bernard’s offers DEQ repair and adjustments, check-engine light diagnosis, manufacturer-scheduled maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension repair, timing belt tune-ups, radiator and water pump work, as well as engine, transmission and air conditioning service.

“We are straight shooters and will let you know what the problem is and what the cost is upfront,” Operations Manager John Sciarra says.

Sciarra, an 18 year veteran of Bernard’s, has attained numerous specialty vehicle class certifications. With 26 years in the industry overall, Sciarra is our INSIDER for automotive excellence.

Bernard’s Garage is a 17-year-long supporter of the Milwaukie Farmers Market, a Milwaukie First Friday participant and frequently donates to the Annie Ross House, Milwaukie Senior Center and other local schools and events.

A member of the Clackamas County Chamber of Commerce since 1955, Bernard’s has been named Business of the Year twice since 2000, and has received the BRAG award from the county for practicing responsible recycling and waste management.

Bernard's Garage 

2036 SE Washington St, Milwaukie, OR.

(503) 659-7722

bernardsgarage.com

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Obituaries

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Duane Michael Chasteen

Dec. 19. 1955 - Nov. 19, 2012

Oregon City resident Duane Michael Chasteen passed away in Portland on Nov. 19, at the age of 56.

He was born to parents Donald and Mary Chasteen on Dec. 19, 1955, in Portland, where he was raised.

He is survived by: daughters, Danette Nowak, Jamie Jajey, Dalaina Chasteen and Shanell Chasteen; mother, Mary L. Chasteen; sisters, Darlene Hanks, Debbie Larson and Danay Given; brother, Donald Chasteen; and 16 grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by: his daughter, Daidra Chasteen Evans; father, Delmar Chasteen; and brothers, Lamarr and Darrell Chasteen.

To light a candle in his honor and sign the online guest book, please visit anewtradition.com. Arrangements: Crown Memorial Center Milwaukie.

Sandra V. Dennis

Sept. 26, 1946 - Nov. 17, 2012

Sandra V. Dennis passed away Nov. 17 in Clackamas.

She was born on Sept. 26, 1946, in Bridgeport, Conn., to Nelson and Joan Gagne. She graduated from high school in 1965, and went on to attend Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Conn., where she had a keen interest in social work.

A homemaker, wife and mother, she attended Church of All Nations, and loved spending quality time with her grandchildren, keeping a journal, visits to the beach and going on long drives with her husband, Peter, whom she married at a ceremony in Vancouver, Wash., on Aug. 12, 1982.

She always put others before herself and made sure to be there for any friend in need. She took great pride in teaching her children and grandchildren about the lord Jesus Christ, whom she loved with an unwavering faith. She died peacefully, surrounded by family, and will be greatly missed by all who knew her.

She is survived by: her daughters, Chris, and her husband, Bob, and Michelle, and her husband, Todd; sons, Thomas and Michael; grandchildren, Jacob, Kody, Brenden, Christian, Chantelle, Chloe and Samantha; stepgrandchildren, Cory and Ashley; and siblings, Marilyn, Nelson, John and Joanne.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Nelson and Josephine Gagne; and by her second husband, John Wayne Voss, the father of her son Michael.

A private memorial will be held at Church of All Nations in Portland, and a celebration of life will be held at a later date. A memorial fund has been set up in Sandra Dennis’s name at U.S. Bank-Oak Grove Branch.

Arrangements: Emily’s Cremation and Burial.

Oral (Bud) Dow Gibson

Jan. 26, 1926 - Nov. 17, 2012

Oral (Bud) Dow Gibson died Nov. 17.

He was born Jan. 26, 1926, in Madras, and was raised in Idaho and Oregon. He joined the Army during World War II and fought in the Battle of the Bulge, where he was captured and interned in a prison camp in Germany.

Upon his release, he settled in Oregon City, where he met and married Eva J. Gibson. They moved to Wilsonville in 1960, where they built a house and raised six children.

Mr. Gibson held several jobs in the area and retired from Dammasch State Hospital, where he worked as a psychiatric aide. He enjoyed hiking, fishing, gardening and woodworking.

He was the eldest of nine children and is survived by: sisters, Donna Strahan and Joan Gibson; children, Beth Niquette, Leola Gibson, Clytie Garretson and Mark and Darren Gibson; 16 grandchildren; and two great-granddaughters.

His eldest son, Dow Gibson, preceded him in death.

A celebration of life was held at Tualatin Hills Christian Church on Saturday, Dec. 1. Remembrances may be made in his honor to the veterans service organization of your choice.

Arrangements: Peake Funeral Chapel, Milwaukie.

William “Bill” Hall

June 24, 1951 - Nov. 24, 2012

William “Bill” Hall passed away in his home from complications of multiple sclerosis on Nov. 24, at the age of 61.

He was born in Portland, to parents Ray and Mena Hall on June 24, 1951. He was raised in Portland and graduated from David Douglas High School in 1969. Throughout his working life he worked as a warehouse man at Montgomery Ward for many years, then as a U.S. Bank courier and clerk, and later he worked at the State of Oregon Employment Office in Oregon City. He lived in the Portland Montevilla area when he was young, in Milwaukie in his 20s and 30s and then in Oregon City for the last 19 years. In May of 1987 he married Audrey Bauman.

Mr. Hall was a big San Diego Chargers fan, collected model cars and loved music.

He is survived by: his wife, Audrey; daughter, Jennifer; sister, Judy; and niece, Shannon.

He was preceded in death by: his father, Raymond; mother, Mena; and sister, Sally.

A memorial gathering was held on Dec. 1, at High Rocks Restaurant, in Gladstone. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to OHSU Foundation MS Research 1121 S.W. Salmon St., Ste. 100, Portland, OR 97205-2021 or ohsufoundation.org. To light a candle in his honor and sign the online guest book please visit anewtradition.com.

Arrangements: Crown Memorial Center Milwaukie.

Maxwell Clayton “Clay” Lefebvre

June 24, 1956 - Nov. 10, 2012

Maxwell Clayton “Clay” Lefebvre died Nov. 10, in Oregon City, where he had lived since January 1997.

He was born June 24, 1956, in Monterey Park, Calif. He was married to Rose E. Hodgerson on May 29, 1976, in a park in Santa Ana, Calif. — they wrote their own ceremony and vows to each other. They were married 36 years.

Mr. Lefebvre enjoyed the outdoors and they took many vacations camping, fishing and hiking. He often said some of them could have been from “America’s Funniest Home Videos.”

He loved animals, and they had many cats and a few dogs over the years. His laughter was contagious, his smile warming and his heart big.

Mr. Lefebvre is survived by: his wife, Rose E. Lefebvre; son, James Clayton Lefebvre; his father, Warren Channing Lefebvre, and stepmother, Marie-France Lefebvre; brother, Channing A. Lefebvre; sister, Sophie Kubichek; niece, Jessica Wells; nephew, Jason Wells Deshon; and many aunts, uncles and cousins.

He was preceded in death by his sister, Laura M. Wells, and mother, Ellen Weir Barker.

Donations in his name can be made to the Gus Memorial Fund at Milner Veterinary, 1034 Molalla Ave., Oregon City, OR 97045, to help pets of owners who have low/no income to receive medical care.

Arrangements: Crown Memorial Center - Milwaukie

Eugene “Gene” J. Maire, M.D.

July 28, 1911 - Nov. 26, 2012

Eugene “Gene” J. Maire, M.D., died on Nov. 26.

He was born in Anamosa, Iowa, to Theodore and Anna (McNally) Maire, on July 28, 1911. He married Betty VanAckeren in Humphrey, Neb., on Sept. 17, 1940. They celebrated 72 years of marriage in September.

Dr. Maire served as a Captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps from 1942-1945 in field hospitals in England, France, Belgium and Germany, processing POW’s. He enjoyed golf, reading, writing and singing. He had a beautiful voice and sang with numerous groups, and often sang after dinner in the dining room.

He practiced medicine in Vail, Iowa, from 1937-1942, and after his military service, he practiced in Milwaukie for 30 years, and then as an emergency room physician in Portland hospitals. He was a wonderful husband and father, and a compassionate and skillful physician.

Dr. Maire is survived by: his wife, Betty; children, Judith Maire, Margaret Gratton, Janet Harris, John Maire and Patricia Gardner; nine grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

A Rosary and Mass were held on Nov. 30 at Saint John The Baptist Catholic Church, in Milwaukie. A cemetery service with military honors was held on Dec. 3 at Willamette National Cemetery, in Portland.

Those wishing may contribute in his memory to Saint John The Baptist Catholic School.

Arrangements: Stehn Family Chapels Milwaukie.

For more information please visit stehnfuneralhomes.com.

Donald McKay

Sept. 13, 1929 - on Nov. 23, 2012

Donald McKay passed away peacefully with his daughters holding his hands in West Linn, on Nov. 23, from COPD, at the age of 83.

He was born in Astoria to parents Thomas and Elizabeth McKay on Sept. 13, 1929. He was raised in Seaside and graduated from Seaside High School. He later went on to attend Vanport College and Oregon State University.

He joined the Army in 1946 and was discharged in 1948; in 1964 he married Dayle Shipley. Mr. McKay worked as a salesman and was very active in his community. He was a Seaside city councilman, a member of the Seaside Library Board and the Seaside Convention Commission. He was also a member of the American Legion and the Cascade Sports Car Club.

Although he lived in both West Linn and Seaside, his heart was always in Seaside.

Mr. McKay is survived by and will be greatly missed by: his wife, Dayle McKay; son, Bruce McKay; daughters, Cori McKay and Lessli Rushforth; and grandchildren, David McKay, Sean McKay, Siena Miyamura, Nolan Miyamura and Kaelyn Rushforth.

He was preceded in death by: his father, Thomas McKay; mother, Elizabeth McKay; sister, Marion Rodgers; and brother, Thomas P. McKay.

There will be a private burial at Willamette National Cemetery and a celebration of life at a later date. To light a candle in his honor and to sign the online guest book visit anewtradition.com.

Arrangements: Crown Memorial Center Milwaukie.

Lloyd W. Olson

Oct. 24, 1932 - Nov. 12, 2012

Lloyd W. Olson passed away in Happy Valley on Nov. 12, at the age of 80.

He was born to parents Lloyd R. and Katherine Olson in Centralia, Wash., on Oct. 24, 1932. He graduated from high school in Centralia and later attended the University of Washington College of Forestry and received a bachelor’s degree in 1954.

In 1957, he joined the U. S. Navy and was discharged in 1959.

In 1962, he married Lucile Pond and together they had three sons: Daniel, Joseph and Patrick.

Mr. Olson worked as a forester with the U. S. Forest Service in Washington, Oregon, Alaska and Washington, D.C. He was a member of Springwater Presbyterian Church.

He is survived by: his wife, Lucile; sons, Daniel, Joseph and Patrick Olson; and grandson, Arther Olson.

Donations may be made in his name to the Springwater Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box 1017, Estacada, OR 97023.

To sign the online guest book and light a candle in his honor please visit anewtradition.com.

Arrangements: Crown Memorial Center Milwaukie.

Elane Havens Parrish

July 12, 1919 - Nov. 21, 2012

Elane Havens Parrish passed away in Dallas, Ore., at the age of 93.

She was born in Kansas City, Mo., on July 12, 1919. The daughter of Edward and Flora Parrish, she was raised in Nebraska, and graduated from Hartington Nebraska High School in 1939.

She worked in the electronics industry, attended Lynchwood Church of God and loved to read about history and science. She resided in Milwaukie for more than 40 years.

Mrs. Parris is survived by: children, Ralph (Mary) Parrish; Arlene (Alex) Becker and Lois (Larry) Gabriel; grandchildren, Tina and Rich Lamar, Toney Becker, Wendy and Mark Lusby, Darrel and Jen Gabriel, Bryan Gabriel and David Parrish; 14 great-grandchildren, Josh, Ben, Andy, Jake and Tasha Lamar, Tim, David, Quynh, Anh and Joseph Linh Lusby, Mai and Ami Becker and Calysta Gabriel and Isa Smith; and five great-great-grandchildren, Matt, Kaden, Landon and Naleigh Lamar and Eliah Lusby.

She was preceded in death by her husband, Wilbur R. Parrish.

A private burial was performed at Lincoln Memorial Park.

Arrangements: Crown Memorial Center - Milwaukie.

To sign the online guest book and light a candle in her honor, please visit anewtradition.com.

Kyle Robert Pressel

June 3, 1988 - Nov. 18, 2012

Clackamas resident Kyle Robert Pressel died Sunday, Nov. 18; he was 24 years old.

He was born June 3, 1988, and raised in Clackamas, graduating from Clackamas High School.

He worked as a machinist at Grovetec U.S. in Clackamas, and served in the U. S. Marine Corps. He enjoyed 4-wheeling, drifting and camping.

He is survived by: sons, Adahm and Aiden Pressel, and Samuel Lugar; the mother of his sons, Brittni Lugar; mother, Darlene Lopez Chavez; brother, Jeremy Cochran; and his grandmother, uncles, aunts and cousins.

He was preceded in death by his grandfather, Lyle.

A memorial was held at Holman-Hankins on Wednesday, Nov. 21, in Oregon City.

Stephanie Gene Stangel (Steph)

March 3, 1949 - Oct. 21, 2012

Stephanie Gene Stangel peacefully and very unexpectedly joined her parents Sunday, Oct. 21; she died of heart failure at 63.

She was born March 3, 1949, in Portland, the eldest of Ben and Ann (Drnjevic) Stangel’s four children. She grew up in Milwaukie and attended St. John’s Grade School, which her mother also attended. She attended St. Mary’s Academy High School in Portland and continued her education at Oregon State University in pre-nursing.

She was a lifelong OSU Beaver fan; her favorite color was OSU orange. She graduated from the University of Oregon School of Nursing with a bachelor of science degree in nursing. To celebrate graduation, she took an extended trip to Europe, where she was able to visit family in Yugoslavia.

She completed the Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Program (CPNP-PC) at OHSU and practiced in Portland, before moving to Eugene where she lived and worked for over 30 years. Wherever she went in Eugene she would run into her “kids” and their “kids.”

One of those “kids,” Jincy, and her husband, Robbie, became Ms. Stangel’s neighbors and her Eugene family. Their daughters, Ellie and Josie, are the next generation of Steph’s “kids.”

Those who were blessed to have her in their lives will always remember the wonderful cards with heartfelt messages celebrating birthdays, graduations, anniversaries, holidays and any and all special occasions.

She had the gift of a truly green thumb. Gardening was a true joy, whether it was digging in a vegetable garden or planting beautiful pots to share.

She enjoyed bringing holidays to life with exquisite decorating. The fall season, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas, were her favorites. She loved the changing colors, harvest moon and the promise of cool weather.

She was an avid recycler who believed we should tread as softly as possible. She volunteered on the beach clean-up events along the Oregon coast that she loved.

Her passions in life were family, children, travel, gardening, the beach and recording events in photographs. She will be truly missed especially at family reunions, where she added that special touch that made them a party.

She is survived by: sisters, Doreen Stangel and Diane Howard (Dan); brother, Jamie Stangel (Jamie); niece, Alli; nephew, Justin; Aunt Fran; and her extended family and friends.

Her legacy is the unconditional love she gave to all the hearts she touched.

A celebration of life was held on Friday, Nov. 23, at St. John’s Catholic Church, in Milwaukie; a reception followed.