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Brought to you by Craig and Jodie - Budget Blinds - WINDOW TREATMENT INSIDER -


BUDGET BLINDS - Craig and JodieStatistics show that an average of one serious injury or fatality occurs each month from blind cord strangulation, both of which are highly avoidable. Cordless window treatments can help make your home a safer place for family and pets. These coverings offer both stylish fashions as well as elimination of cords, allowing you to design as creatively as you would like to.

Wood, faux wood, composite, and honeycomb blinds are just a few of the options that can be made cordless, either through motorization or through wand-controlled operation of louvers, both of which eliminate dangerous, dangling cords.

Shades are the most versatile window treatment, offering a wide variety of styles, color options, fabrics and material choices. Best of all, shades can be cordless or motorized making them ideal window coverings for those with children and/or pets in their homes and/or businesses.

Another option to consider are shutters. Shutters are an incredible window treatment offering clean, crisp lines that complement all décor styles. Shutters are great for arched, rounded, and other unique window shapes that can be a challenge to address. All shutters are custom made from both premium wood and composite materials and they are always cordless.

If you are ready to make your home safer for those you love, call us at 503-590-4333 for a free, in-home consultation. We can translate your safety concerns and style preferences into beautiful custom window coverings for your home.

Budget Blinds

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(503) 590-4333

budgetblinds.com

Brought to you by John Sciarra - Bernard's Garage - AUTO REPAIR INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John Sciarra Before you hit the open road this summer, run through the Bernard’s Garage Road Trip Checklist to lower your chances of getting sidelined by vehicle troubles.

Check your tires: Are your tires at the correct pressure? How much tread do your tires have left? How even is the tire wear? Tires are the most common component of vehicles to fail, so make sure yours are in good condition

Make a road trip playlist: There’s nothing worse than the static of a radio with no service, so burn a CD or create an mp3 playlist with your favorite jams to keep the good times rolling.

Check your different engine fluids: If your transmission fluid isn’t pinkish and almost clear, have it drained and changed out. Check to make sure you have the proper amount of coolant in your cooling system. And change out the oil and air filter in your engine. The improved fuel economy alone is reason enough.

Bring some good snacks: There’s nothing worse than a car full of hungry people yelling at each other. Grab a couple of bottles of water per person, and have foods like trail mix, granola bars, bananas, and jerky handy for when hunger strikes

Stop by Bernard’s Garage: At Bernard’s Garage, vehicle safety is our number one concern. Our knowledgeable and experienced technicians can help ensure your vehicle is running smoothly before your trip. Give us a call, check out the website, or stop by today!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - Automotive INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraWhat’s less fun than getting stuck in a nasty traffic jam? Getting cooked in your car on a hot day.

Summer's here and your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing, the system may need to be recharged. Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as Freon. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on a vehicle’s air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of peripheral components at the same time.

Bernard’s, which has been in business since 1925, services our clients’ foreign, domestic, hybrid and electric cars, trucks, vans and motorcycles. We offer free pickup and delivery for our customers’ convenience.

Plan ahead and stay cool this season!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - Auto Repair INSIDER -


John Sciarra, Bernard's GarageWhat’s less fun than getting stuck in a nasty traffic jam? Getting cooked in your car on a hot day.

Summer's right around the corner and your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing, the system may need to be recharged. Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as Freon. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on a vehicle’s air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of peripheral components at the same time.

Bernard’s, which has been in business since 1925, services our clients’ foreign, domestic, hybrid and electric cars, trucks, vans and motorcycles. We offer free pickup and delivery for our customers’ convenience.

Plan ahead and stay cool this season!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - AUTOMOTIVE INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraSummer's imminent arrival means your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing cold, the system may need to be recharged.

Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as R-12, or Freon, until researchers found it caused ozone depletion. As such, it's illegal to use Freon in vehicles built after 1994. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on an air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of periphery components at the same time.

Why? The easy answer is working on an air conditioning system is about as fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

To avoid draining your refrigerant, removing your compressor, installing a new unit and refilling the system with new cool stuff — only to have you come back in a week and say it's still not cold enough — it makes sense to replace the necessary components.

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by Mike Nielsen of Snap Fitness - FITNESS INSIDER -


SNAP FITNESS - Mike NielsenAs the inspirational saying goes, “Live less out of habit and more out of intent.”

While it’s true that starting a fitness routine can be difficult, I offer the following tips to get you in the gym door and on the road to good health.

Assessment — New SNAP Fitness clients receive a free jump-start session, including consultation with a trainer. The assessment determines the client’s baseline, helps us guide their first steps, and is an opportunity to discuss adding personal training.

Cardio — The national recommendation for exercise for all ages and fitness levels is to get to the gym at least three days per week, and to do a minimum of 30 minutes of cardio per visit. Working out with a friend will make it more fun, help you feel more accountable, help you stay at the gym for more months and achieve a higher level of success.

Strength training is key to replacing fat with muscle, becoming leaner, stronger and improving balance. Do two to three sessions of strength training per week.

Nutritional guidelines — Instead of eating three large meals per day, eat five to six small meals. This will fuel your energy throughout the day and avoid post-meal sluggishness. Also drink 96 ounces of water daily.

Online help — SNAP has a complete online nutritional program and training center. Free with membership, it provides a personalized workout plan, sample menus and a complete library of instruction videos.

Snap Fitness

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/milwaukie-or-97222/1023

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/oregoncity-or-97045/400

Brought to you by Mike Nielsen - Snap Fitness - Fitness INSIDER


Mike Nielsen, Snap FitnessStrength training is an essential part of an exercise program, even for someone who hasn’t been active in a while.

Lifting weights, using weight machines and doing core work increases muscle mass and bone density.

As we age, our muscles deteriorate (called sarcopenia) and bone density decreases.

Research shows that seniors are more susceptible to bone breakage that younger adults. As people age, their metabolism slows down. We are seeing more and more seniors joining gyms.

If we take the average adult between the ages of 40 and 50 and do basic strength-training three to four times per week for 90 days, the outcome can be life-changing.

Here’s a myth-buster: Muscle does NOT weigh more than fat! A pound is a pound. 

Muscle is, however, more dense than body fat and takes up less area than fat. If you were to start an exercise program complete with strength training, you would increase your lean body mass and decrease body fat.

The body takes up less space and metabolism speeds up, resulting in a higher BMR (base metabolic rate, the amount of daily caloric intake needed to maintain LBM and weight.) This reverses sarcopenia and increases bone density.   

Not everyone walks into a gym and knows exactly what to do. Snap gives new members an opportunity to meet with a Certified Personal Trainer, who assesses their body and their goals. 

Let’s get started.

Snap Fitness

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/milwaukie-or-97222/1023

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/oregoncity-or-97045/400

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - AUTO MAINTENANCE INSIDER


John Sciarra, Bernard's GarageRegular maintenance on your car is, quite simply, a good investment.

For example, when you bring your car in for a timing belt — typically needed at 90,000 to 100,000 miles— it costs in the range of $400 to $500. But if it breaks, it might be $1,800 to $2,000.

At our shop, when we do it, we do it right. With the timing belt, we also replace the timing belt tensioner, idler pulleys, camshaft seals, water pump and coolant.

Mileage interval maintenance, which is only done by shops, should be done at 30,000, 60,000 and 90,000 miles.

The ideal scenario is to get the car into the shop about three times per year for inspections, which will find things like rodent damage, which is more common than you might think. It’s mainly squirrels in this area.

An inspection will also uncover leaking coolant or oil, as well as plugged-up air filters. Once a year, you should get a brake inspection.

We do complete automotive repair, including pre-purchase inspections for $150. That’s a comprehensive inspection, which can detect unforeseen problems and save you from buying a compromised vehicle.

Our average cost for an oil change is $38; $58 for a brake inspection.

It’s a small investment. We do it properly and can save you a lot of trouble and expense down the road.

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

bernardsgarage.com/

Mike Nielsen - Snap Fitness - Fitness INSIDER


SNAP FITNESS - Mike Nielsen“We are a friendly, success-oriented fitness center,” says Mike Nielsen, vice president and co-owner of Snap Fitness locations in Oregon City, Milwaukie and Canby. “We’re like the ‘Cheers’ of the gym world, where everybody knows your name.”

Nielsen has been a certified fitness coach for 13 years and has been with Snap for eight years. He says being a fitness coach is all about helping individuals achieve the best version of themselves.

“It’s not just something that’s done at the gym, but it’s a lifestyle change,” he said of Snap. “We focus on not only the physical but also the mental and emotional aspects of everyday life, to make sure we are able to achieve long-term success.”

He says Snap gyms have a family feel and a personal touch.

The gyms are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with monitored access for safety. Snap has more than 1,500 locations nationwide.

The fitness centers offer cardio, personal training, weight-loss programs, a health center, strength training and Olympic lifting. An online web page for members offers nutrition counseling and an online training center.

“Our members are our greatest assets,” Nielsen added. “We do all we can to make sure they have not only the best facility and equipment, but a wonderful experience.”

Snap Fitness

www.snapfitness.com/

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

Canby: 1109 SW 1st Ave.

503-266-5515

Brought to you by John Sciarra - Bernard's Garage - AUTOMOTIVE INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraAfter nearly 100 years of providing excellent full-service automotive repair and maintenance, Bernard’s Garage is a classic Milwaukie institution trusted by generations of customers.

Founded in 1925, old timers and area residents still remember Joe Bernard Sr., who would design and build custom car parts when his customers’ vehicles needed it. Joe Bernard Jr., a former Milwaukie mayor, helped modernize Bernard’s and continued his father’s tradition of excellent customer service.

The current owner, Jim Bernard, another Milwaukie mayor and current Clackamas County commissioner, has computerized Bernard’s—turning his father’s mechanics into today’s technicians.

Besides providing free pickup and delivery, Bernard’s offers DEQ repair and adjustments, check-engine light diagnosis, manufacturer-scheduled maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension repair, timing belt tune-ups, radiator and water pump work, as well as engine, transmission and air conditioning service.

“We are straight shooters and will let you know what the problem is and what the cost is upfront,” Operations Manager John Sciarra says.

Sciarra, an 18 year veteran of Bernard’s, has attained numerous specialty vehicle class certifications. With 26 years in the industry overall, Sciarra is our INSIDER for automotive excellence.

Bernard’s Garage is a 17-year-long supporter of the Milwaukie Farmers Market, a Milwaukie First Friday participant and frequently donates to the Annie Ross House, Milwaukie Senior Center and other local schools and events.

A member of the Clackamas County Chamber of Commerce since 1955, Bernard’s has been named Business of the Year twice since 2000, and has received the BRAG award from the county for practicing responsible recycling and waste management.

Bernard's Garage 

2036 SE Washington St, Milwaukie, OR.

(503) 659-7722

bernardsgarage.com

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Metro's drive-less campaign fuels up

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by: PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO: L.E. BASKOW - TriMet's Green Line MAX trains cross Johnson Creek Boulevard while carrying passengers between Gateway and Clackamas Town Center as a way to reduce traffic congestion on Interstate 205.The state wants you to drive less, and Metro has to make that happen.

The state’s goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. Metro, the regional government that includes Oregon City, Milwaukie, Clackamas, Gladstone and Happy Valley, is required to present its plan to the 2015 Legislature. The cities and counties within Metro are then expected to adopt it.

As part of the planning process, Metro is considering many ideas to encourage you to reduce your driving. They include increasing the cost of driving, making transit more convenient, building more bike and walking paths, and encouraging you to live closer to where you work and shop.

“It’s still really hard to explain to people,” Metro Councilor Carlotta Collette told the West Linn City Council during its March 11 meeting about the program. Collette represents District 2, which includes Gladstone, Johnson City, Lake Oswego, Milwaukie, Oregon City, Rivergrove, West Linn, a portion of Southwest Portland and unincorporated parts of Clackamas County.

Metro is calling its new project Climate Smart Communities. Some of the proposals reflect Metro’s existing policies.

One local example of attempts to improve transportation and reduce emissions is Clackamas County’s Clackamas Town Center redevelopment project. Created in 1980, the 819-acre town center area plan called for road improvements along Southeast 82nd Avenue and included TriMet’s Green Line light-rail route in its transportation links.

The town center’s connection to Interstate 205 and Sunnyside Road has made it one of the region’s fastest growing areas in the past three decades.

The project has been altered to reflect growth in Milwaukie and Happy Valley, the two cities surrounding the area, but it has maintained efforts to add local housing and improve traffic flow.

Metro plans to publicly discuss the Climate Smart Communities research in May. The discussions will take place at two standing advisory committees that include elected officials from throughout the region, the Metro Policy Advisory Committee and the Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation. They will make recommendations to the seven-member elected Metro Council, which will decide where to focus the research.

“We need to step up our planning and actually implement some of these changes,” Collette said.

Metro wants to hear from you before that decision is made. It will be conducting an online survey on the issues and ideas under discussion in the first week of April.

“The No. 1 reason to do this is it’s good for business. It’s good for our way of life in this region. And, oh by the way, it cuts down greenhouse gas emissions,” Collette said.

You can register and take the survey at www.climatesmartsurvey.com

Your personal information will not be sold or shared with other governments or private companies. For more information on the surveys, visit optinpanel.org. 

Growing population

State government has been fighting climate change for years. The 2007 Legislature approved the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the state to 75 percent of the 1990 level by 2050. The 2009 Legislature directed Metro to help achieve that goal by reducing emissions from cars, light trucks and sport utility vehicles. The target was eventually set at 20 percent below 2005 levels by 2035.

Metro already is in charge of transportation in the urban areas of Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties. Among other things, it has adopted a 2040 Concept Plan that encourages mixed-use development in centers along existing transportation corridors. It also sets the Portland area’s urban growth boundary that determines where development can occur.

When Metro computed the numbers, it concluded the state’s target was realistic. Area residents already drive about 20 percent less than those in similar metropolitan regions. That is largely because of land-use policies and the regional transit system operated by TriMet.

But the elected Metro Council also decided that reducing driving — in and of itself — wasn’t good enough. The council wants those living in the region to have options that improve the qualities of their lives. That is also the purpose of a Metro project called Making the Greatest Place. It is intended to help all communities set and achieve their livability goals.

Adding to the challenge, between 2010 and 2035, the population within the urban growth boundary is projected to increase by more than 625,000 residents.

Development scenarios

Metro completed the first phase of the project in January 2012 and published a report titled “Understanding Our Land Use and Transportation Choices.” It included the results of tests of six potential techniques for reducing driving. The incentives are: community design, fleet mix, marketing and incentives, pricing, roads and technology.

In the report, Metro staff looked at how three different levels of each technique could produce three different scenarios, which were labeled A, B and C.

Scenario A reflects current plans and policies. Among other things, they include increasing the area within the urban growth boundary from 257,569 to 257,680 acres, keeping the bike mode share — the proportion of relatively short trips made by bike rather than car or other means — at 2 percent, maintaining projections for transit use, keeping the 48 cents-per-gallon gas tax the same and not imposing a road use fee.

Scenario B reflects more ambitious policy changes. They include the same urban growth boundary increase but would raise the bike mode share to 12.5 percent, increasing projected transit use 2.5 times, raising the gas tax by 18 cents a gallon, increasing the proportion of workers participating in employer-based commuting programs from the current 20 to 40 percent, and imposing a road use fee of 3 cents per mile.

Scenario C reflects policy changes Metro admits are even more ambitious. They include no expansion of the urban growth boundary, increasing the bike share mode to 30 percent, increasing projected transit use four times, changing the mix of autos to light trucks or SUVs from the 57-43 percent split to 71-29, more than doubling fuel economy from current levels, and imposing a $50 per-ton carbon emissions fee.

Portland Creep

The Climate Smart Communities project is also unfolding during a growing public backlash to some of Metro’s policies. Last November, Clackamas County voters elected two new commissioners who ran against “Portland Creep,” their term for transit-oriented development. Last fall, the Lake Oswego City Council backed off a proposed Portland Streetcar extension that would have been part of a new development near Highway 43.

New Portland Mayor Charlie Hales is prioritizing street maintenance over new transit projects. And Clark County officials are trying to block the new light-rail line planned as part of the Columbia River Crossing project.

Previous discussions about finding new revenue sources have not gone very far in recent years. Former Portland Mayor Sam Adams proposed, then backed away from a new street maintenance fee when he was a commissioner. The public-private Regional Investment Initiative has explored encouraging private investment in public projects but has not endorsed a new, regional revenue source. Although Hales and Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber have talked about the need for tax reform, it is unclear whether the 2013 Legislature will tackle the issue.

At the same time, voters have occasionally been willing to increase their taxes, especially in Multnomah County. Last November, Portland voters approved a $35 income tax for the arts, Portland Public Schools voters approved a record-breaking $482 million construction bond measure and county voters created a new library district.

Clackamas County has a library district, and Lake Oswego voters agreed last fall to help finance improvements on Boones Ferry Road.

Reporters Lori Hall and Kevin Harden contributed to this news story.