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Brought to you by Craig and Jodie - Budget Blinds - WINDOW TREATMENT INSIDER -


BUDGET BLINDS - Craig and JodieStatistics show that an average of one serious injury or fatality occurs each month from blind cord strangulation, both of which are highly avoidable. Cordless window treatments can help make your home a safer place for family and pets. These coverings offer both stylish fashions as well as elimination of cords, allowing you to design as creatively as you would like to.

Wood, faux wood, composite, and honeycomb blinds are just a few of the options that can be made cordless, either through motorization or through wand-controlled operation of louvers, both of which eliminate dangerous, dangling cords.

Shades are the most versatile window treatment, offering a wide variety of styles, color options, fabrics and material choices. Best of all, shades can be cordless or motorized making them ideal window coverings for those with children and/or pets in their homes and/or businesses.

Another option to consider are shutters. Shutters are an incredible window treatment offering clean, crisp lines that complement all décor styles. Shutters are great for arched, rounded, and other unique window shapes that can be a challenge to address. All shutters are custom made from both premium wood and composite materials and they are always cordless.

If you are ready to make your home safer for those you love, call us at 503-590-4333 for a free, in-home consultation. We can translate your safety concerns and style preferences into beautiful custom window coverings for your home.

Budget Blinds

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(503) 590-4333

budgetblinds.com

Brought to you by John Sciarra - Bernard's Garage - AUTO REPAIR INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John Sciarra Before you hit the open road this summer, run through the Bernard’s Garage Road Trip Checklist to lower your chances of getting sidelined by vehicle troubles.

Check your tires: Are your tires at the correct pressure? How much tread do your tires have left? How even is the tire wear? Tires are the most common component of vehicles to fail, so make sure yours are in good condition

Make a road trip playlist: There’s nothing worse than the static of a radio with no service, so burn a CD or create an mp3 playlist with your favorite jams to keep the good times rolling.

Check your different engine fluids: If your transmission fluid isn’t pinkish and almost clear, have it drained and changed out. Check to make sure you have the proper amount of coolant in your cooling system. And change out the oil and air filter in your engine. The improved fuel economy alone is reason enough.

Bring some good snacks: There’s nothing worse than a car full of hungry people yelling at each other. Grab a couple of bottles of water per person, and have foods like trail mix, granola bars, bananas, and jerky handy for when hunger strikes

Stop by Bernard’s Garage: At Bernard’s Garage, vehicle safety is our number one concern. Our knowledgeable and experienced technicians can help ensure your vehicle is running smoothly before your trip. Give us a call, check out the website, or stop by today!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - Automotive INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraWhat’s less fun than getting stuck in a nasty traffic jam? Getting cooked in your car on a hot day.

Summer's here and your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing, the system may need to be recharged. Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as Freon. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on a vehicle’s air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of peripheral components at the same time.

Bernard’s, which has been in business since 1925, services our clients’ foreign, domestic, hybrid and electric cars, trucks, vans and motorcycles. We offer free pickup and delivery for our customers’ convenience.

Plan ahead and stay cool this season!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - Auto Repair INSIDER -


John Sciarra, Bernard's GarageWhat’s less fun than getting stuck in a nasty traffic jam? Getting cooked in your car on a hot day.

Summer's right around the corner and your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing, the system may need to be recharged. Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as Freon. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on a vehicle’s air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of peripheral components at the same time.

Bernard’s, which has been in business since 1925, services our clients’ foreign, domestic, hybrid and electric cars, trucks, vans and motorcycles. We offer free pickup and delivery for our customers’ convenience.

Plan ahead and stay cool this season!

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - AUTOMOTIVE INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraSummer's imminent arrival means your vehicle's air conditioning system will soon be under serious strain.

If your A/C isn't as frosty as it used to be, but it's still blowing cold, the system may need to be recharged.

Manufacturers used to use a type of refrigerant known as R-12, or Freon, until researchers found it caused ozone depletion. As such, it's illegal to use Freon in vehicles built after 1994. Now, manufacturers use R-134a to keep things cold in the cabin.

Working on an air conditioning system is about as much fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

Unless you are skilled in vehicle maintenance, it’s safest to take the job to a professional.

An AC compressor is usually driven by your vehicle's serpentine belt, and as it spins, it pressurizes the system's refrigerant. It's this change in pressure that cools the air coming into your cabin. The best way to keep your compressor from failing is to have your A/C system serviced once a year.

If your compressor needs replacement, most responsible shops will recommend swapping out a number of periphery components at the same time.

Why? The easy answer is working on an air conditioning system is about as fun as sticking your hand in a blender. Twice.

To avoid draining your refrigerant, removing your compressor, installing a new unit and refilling the system with new cool stuff — only to have you come back in a week and say it's still not cold enough — it makes sense to replace the necessary components.

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

>bernardsgarage.com/

Brought to you by Mike Nielsen of Snap Fitness - FITNESS INSIDER -


SNAP FITNESS - Mike NielsenAs the inspirational saying goes, “Live less out of habit and more out of intent.”

While it’s true that starting a fitness routine can be difficult, I offer the following tips to get you in the gym door and on the road to good health.

Assessment — New SNAP Fitness clients receive a free jump-start session, including consultation with a trainer. The assessment determines the client’s baseline, helps us guide their first steps, and is an opportunity to discuss adding personal training.

Cardio — The national recommendation for exercise for all ages and fitness levels is to get to the gym at least three days per week, and to do a minimum of 30 minutes of cardio per visit. Working out with a friend will make it more fun, help you feel more accountable, help you stay at the gym for more months and achieve a higher level of success.

Strength training is key to replacing fat with muscle, becoming leaner, stronger and improving balance. Do two to three sessions of strength training per week.

Nutritional guidelines — Instead of eating three large meals per day, eat five to six small meals. This will fuel your energy throughout the day and avoid post-meal sluggishness. Also drink 96 ounces of water daily.

Online help — SNAP has a complete online nutritional program and training center. Free with membership, it provides a personalized workout plan, sample menus and a complete library of instruction videos.

Snap Fitness

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/milwaukie-or-97222/1023

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/oregoncity-or-97045/400

Brought to you by Mike Nielsen - Snap Fitness - Fitness INSIDER


Mike Nielsen, Snap FitnessStrength training is an essential part of an exercise program, even for someone who hasn’t been active in a while.

Lifting weights, using weight machines and doing core work increases muscle mass and bone density.

As we age, our muscles deteriorate (called sarcopenia) and bone density decreases.

Research shows that seniors are more susceptible to bone breakage that younger adults. As people age, their metabolism slows down. We are seeing more and more seniors joining gyms.

If we take the average adult between the ages of 40 and 50 and do basic strength-training three to four times per week for 90 days, the outcome can be life-changing.

Here’s a myth-buster: Muscle does NOT weigh more than fat! A pound is a pound. 

Muscle is, however, more dense than body fat and takes up less area than fat. If you were to start an exercise program complete with strength training, you would increase your lean body mass and decrease body fat.

The body takes up less space and metabolism speeds up, resulting in a higher BMR (base metabolic rate, the amount of daily caloric intake needed to maintain LBM and weight.) This reverses sarcopenia and increases bone density.   

Not everyone walks into a gym and knows exactly what to do. Snap gives new members an opportunity to meet with a Certified Personal Trainer, who assesses their body and their goals. 

Let’s get started.

Snap Fitness

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/milwaukie-or-97222/1023

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

www.snapfitness.com/gyms/oregoncity-or-97045/400

Brought to you by John Sciarra, Bernard's Garage - AUTO MAINTENANCE INSIDER


John Sciarra, Bernard's GarageRegular maintenance on your car is, quite simply, a good investment.

For example, when you bring your car in for a timing belt — typically needed at 90,000 to 100,000 miles— it costs in the range of $400 to $500. But if it breaks, it might be $1,800 to $2,000.

At our shop, when we do it, we do it right. With the timing belt, we also replace the timing belt tensioner, idler pulleys, camshaft seals, water pump and coolant.

Mileage interval maintenance, which is only done by shops, should be done at 30,000, 60,000 and 90,000 miles.

The ideal scenario is to get the car into the shop about three times per year for inspections, which will find things like rodent damage, which is more common than you might think. It’s mainly squirrels in this area.

An inspection will also uncover leaking coolant or oil, as well as plugged-up air filters. Once a year, you should get a brake inspection.

We do complete automotive repair, including pre-purchase inspections for $150. That’s a comprehensive inspection, which can detect unforeseen problems and save you from buying a compromised vehicle.

Our average cost for an oil change is $38; $58 for a brake inspection.

It’s a small investment. We do it properly and can save you a lot of trouble and expense down the road.

Bernard’s Garage

2036 SE Washington St., Milwaukie

503-659-7722

bernardsgarage.com/

Mike Nielsen - Snap Fitness - Fitness INSIDER


SNAP FITNESS - Mike Nielsen“We are a friendly, success-oriented fitness center,” says Mike Nielsen, vice president and co-owner of Snap Fitness locations in Oregon City, Milwaukie and Canby. “We’re like the ‘Cheers’ of the gym world, where everybody knows your name.”

Nielsen has been a certified fitness coach for 13 years and has been with Snap for eight years. He says being a fitness coach is all about helping individuals achieve the best version of themselves.

“It’s not just something that’s done at the gym, but it’s a lifestyle change,” he said of Snap. “We focus on not only the physical but also the mental and emotional aspects of everyday life, to make sure we are able to achieve long-term success.”

He says Snap gyms have a family feel and a personal touch.

The gyms are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with monitored access for safety. Snap has more than 1,500 locations nationwide.

The fitness centers offer cardio, personal training, weight-loss programs, a health center, strength training and Olympic lifting. An online web page for members offers nutrition counseling and an online training center.

“Our members are our greatest assets,” Nielsen added. “We do all we can to make sure they have not only the best facility and equipment, but a wonderful experience.”

Snap Fitness

www.snapfitness.com/

Milwaukie: 4200 SE King Rd.

503-353-7627

Oregon City: 19703 S. Hwy. 213, Ste. 170

503-656-2580

Canby: 1109 SW 1st Ave.

503-266-5515

Brought to you by John Sciarra - Bernard's Garage - AUTOMOTIVE INSIDER -


BERNARD'S GARAGE - John SciarraAfter nearly 100 years of providing excellent full-service automotive repair and maintenance, Bernard’s Garage is a classic Milwaukie institution trusted by generations of customers.

Founded in 1925, old timers and area residents still remember Joe Bernard Sr., who would design and build custom car parts when his customers’ vehicles needed it. Joe Bernard Jr., a former Milwaukie mayor, helped modernize Bernard’s and continued his father’s tradition of excellent customer service.

The current owner, Jim Bernard, another Milwaukie mayor and current Clackamas County commissioner, has computerized Bernard’s—turning his father’s mechanics into today’s technicians.

Besides providing free pickup and delivery, Bernard’s offers DEQ repair and adjustments, check-engine light diagnosis, manufacturer-scheduled maintenance, brakes, steering and suspension repair, timing belt tune-ups, radiator and water pump work, as well as engine, transmission and air conditioning service.

“We are straight shooters and will let you know what the problem is and what the cost is upfront,” Operations Manager John Sciarra says.

Sciarra, an 18 year veteran of Bernard’s, has attained numerous specialty vehicle class certifications. With 26 years in the industry overall, Sciarra is our INSIDER for automotive excellence.

Bernard’s Garage is a 17-year-long supporter of the Milwaukie Farmers Market, a Milwaukie First Friday participant and frequently donates to the Annie Ross House, Milwaukie Senior Center and other local schools and events.

A member of the Clackamas County Chamber of Commerce since 1955, Bernard’s has been named Business of the Year twice since 2000, and has received the BRAG award from the county for practicing responsible recycling and waste management.

Bernard's Garage 

2036 SE Washington St, Milwaukie, OR.

(503) 659-7722

bernardsgarage.com

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Obituaries

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Larry D. Askew

Oct. 29, 1945 - May 12, 2013

Tigard resident Larry D. Askew died on May 12 at age 67. The cause of death was end-stage kidney failure. He had previously lived in Oregon City for 22 years.

He was born on Oct. 29, 1945, in Twin Falls, Idaho, to Hicks and Marcella Askew.

He is survived by: wife, Linda Askew; sons, Jeremy and Dustin Askew; daughter, Emily Askew; brother, Lynn Askew; stepdaughters, Julee and Sherry Welch; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by brother, Wayne Askew, and aunt, Vivian Daiss.

A memorial service was held on June 22 at Blue Lake Regional Park in Tigard.

Arrangements: Crown Memorial-Tualatin.

Jeri Cline Cottis

July 17, 1948 - June 13, 2013

Jeri died peacefully in her home from small cell lung cancer.

Jeri lived in the Milwaukie area for the past 45 years and had dedicated her life to her children and grandchildren. Her great love of sports was second to her love of family.

She is survived by sons Doug and Michael, daughter Stefani Strohl, seven grandchildren, 1 great grandson and sister Jeani Goold.

There will be a very casual, no service “Celebration of Jeri” picnic for family and friends held at Happy Valley Park on July 14 from noon to 4 p.m.

Donations in her name may be made to Portland Adventist Hospice or the American Cancer Society.

Cynthia Marie Fox

Jan. 22, 1952 - June 14, 2013

Cynthia Marie Fox died on June 14.

She was born in Portland on Jan. 22, 1952, to Bill and Ellen Speight, the third of four girls. When she was a toddler, the family moved to Milwaukie and she attended Milwaukie schools, graduating in 1970. She traveled to Europe after graduation and returned to marry her high school sweetheart, Pat Fox, in 1974.

Survivors include: husband, Pat; daughter, Tricia; son, Bryan; granddaughter, Jayden; father, William Speight; sisters, Linda Carson and husband, Bill, and Tracy Canright and husband, Walt. 

She was preceded in death by her mother, Ellen, and sister, Lisa.

A service was held on June 24; private interment was held at Lincoln Memorial Park, Portland.

Arrangements: Stehn Family Chapels.

Laton Kirk

Dec. 14, 1943 - June 10, 2013

Laton “Butch” Riley Kirk was born Dec. 14, 1943 in Southeast Portland to Laton Riley Kirk Sr. and Stephina Magary Kirk. Growing up, Laton helped his dad deliver milk, rode horses, played the guitar and was doted on by his sisters. In 1970 he met the love of his life, Marsha, when she attended one of his band practices, and they were married on Sept. 18, 1970. Laton and Marsha took over the Sunnyside Store, a small grocery store on Sunnyside Road in Clackamas. They worked there for several years and later owned grocery stores in Mollala and Southwest Portland.

Laton and had three children, Corey, Jessie and Israel. The family lived in Milwaukie, and he worked for Kaiser Permanente for 25 years as a landscaping supervisor. In addition to being a fun-loving dad and husband, he was a prolific painter and a guitar player and singer who performed with several bands around town. He coached his kids’ sports teams, liked to play at blues jam sessions at local venues and enjoyed nothing more than having a nice dinner out with his family. In his retirement, he loved to go to coffee with his guitar-playing buddies, he painted oil landscapes and portraits for his children and his greatest joy was playing with his six grandchildren, often spoiling them with candy and affection.

A service was held June 15 at Faith on Hill Church in Milwaukie, where Laton attended for nearly 30 years. Layne’s Battle Ground Funeral Home handled arrangements.

Laton is survived by his beloved wife of 42 years, Marsha; his children and their partners: Corey and Jen Kirk of Gladstone, Jessie and Josh Christiansen of Milwaukie and Israel Kirk and Jeremy Jacques of Portland; his six grandchildren Cody and Zack Berg, Olivia and Henry Christiansen and Parker and Emma Riley Jacques; his adoring sisters Dolores Rothery and Patty Compton as well as a number of cherished cousins, nieces and nephews and in-laws. He was preceded in death by his parents, his brother William Layton Kirk and his granddaughter Samantha Rose Christiansen.

He was loved deeply and will be sincerely missed.

Paul M. Harmon

Dec. 24, 1969 - June 12, 2013

Paul Michael Harmon, 43, died on June 12, in Canby. He was born Dec. 24, 1969, in Minot, N.D., and was raised in Canby.

On Nov. 22, 1997, he married his girlfriend of 15 years Nikki Douglass- Harmon at Oregon City Evangelical Church.

Mr. Harmon is survived by: his wife, Nikki; his two sons, Clayton, 6, and Zachary, 2; parents, Michael and Margo Harmon; sister, Lisa Wilson; grandmother, Estella Harmon; and by a host of other aunts and uncles, cousins and extended family.

A memorial service was held on June 21 at Grace Church in Molalla. A private burial will be held at Mt. View Cemetery in Oregon City. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to Paul Harmon Memorial Fund at Grace Church, 901 N. Molalla Ave., Molalla 97038.

Donald Leroy Kelland

Sept.21, 1925 – June 23, 2013

Donald Leroy Kelland, age 87 of Woodland, Wash., passed away at home with family at his side on Sunday, June 23, following a stroke.

Don was born Sept. 21, 1925, in Oregon City and was the youngest of five children born to Thomas O. Kelland and Bertha Bullard Kelland. He was preceded in death by his wife, Maxine Robbins Kelland, his sisters, Ruth Herrin, Lorene Wimmer and Ophelia Hall Ledbetter and his brother Tom Kelland. He is survived by his stepson, Douglas Ruge (Lori) of Vancouver, nephews Tom Hall (Cheryl) of Los Angeles, Tom Kelland, Jr. and David Wimmer (Marcia) of Oregon City and nieces Kathy Mashek (Rick) of Oregon City and Laurie Gallagher (Joe) of Phoenix, as well as many great-nephews and great- nieces.

Don spent his childhood in Oregon City on the Kelland family farm. He attended public schools in Oregon City and served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Upon his separation from the military, he worked on various local rivers for 37 years before retiring. He began his life on the rivers as a deck hand for Romona Tow Boat Co. (1946-1948) and then worked as a boom man for Jones Lumber Co. (1948-1955). He was a contractor for Oregon City Boom and Rafting (1955-1959) and for Gladstone Boom and Rafting (1959-1961). In 1961, Don moved to Woodland, Wash. where he contracted a log boom on the Lewis River for 22 years, retiring in 1983. Don was also a pilot and flew his own Piper Cub following his discharge from the military.

In 1980, Don married Maxine Robbins. Their life together was spent fishing, clamming and traveling. Their favorite places included Baja Mexico, Desert Hot Springs, California, and Oregon and Washington coasts and mountain lakes.

Don was a true outdoorsman and enjoyed fishing, hunting, trap shooting, crabbing, clam digging, huckleberry picking and vegetable gardening. Don was a long time member of the Oregon City Elks, Canby Rod and Gun Club and Vancouver Trap and Gun Club.

A memorial service will be held Wednesday, July 3, at 11 a.m. at the Woodland Presbyterian Church in Woodland, Wash. where he was a longtime member. A reception will follow in the church fellowship hall. Interment will be in the family plot at Mountain View Cemetery in Oregon City.

In lieu of flowers, family suggests a donation be made to the Woodland Presbyterian Church, PO Box 297, Woodland, WA 98674; to the Donald and Maxine Kelland Charitable Fund of the Community Foundation for SW Washington, 1053 Officers Row, Vancouver, WA 98661; or to a charity of choice.

Lois Joan Rose-George

Oct. 3, 1920 - June 12, 2013

Lois Joan Rose-George died on June 12.

She was born on Oct. 3, 1920, to William Drennen and Irene Grecco. She leaves behind: her husband, Stan George; her three daughters, Sandra (Randy) Scott, Barbara Rose-Cox (Richard), and Kathy (Larry) Powell; grandchildren, Shauna, Brandon, Haleigh and Jordan; and eight great-grandchildren.

Preceding her in death were her parents, and her husband, Vic, who died in 1982.A rosary was held on June 21, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Milwaukie, followed by a Mass of Christian burial.

Arrangements: Peake Funeral Home.

Visit Peakefh.com for a full obituary and to view the online tribute and to sign the guest book.

Joseph D. Simpson

Nov. 20, 1933 - June 18, 2013

Joseph D. Simpson died on June 18.

He was born in Portland on Nov. 20, 1933, and attended Sunset Grade School, West Linn High School and Portland State College. 

He married Joyce (Patterson) on Jan 30, 1951, and fathered two sons, Mark Lynn and Joe Gale Simpson (who died in an accident in 1975). 

Services were held on June 23 at the Oregon City Evangelical Church on Linn Avenue, where he was a member for 38 years.

Arrangements: Holman-Hankins-Bowker & Waud.