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The cost of not passing HR2128 means thousands of visits to doctors, translating to significant costs for Oregonians. This means scheduling a visit with a doctor and taking time off to get a prescription.

House Bill 2128 deletes the requirement that pseudoephedrine be classified as a Schedule III controlled substance. It should be passed.

Pseudoephedrine (PSE) is a safe and effective active ingredient found in leading cold, allergy and sinus medicines to provide congestion relief. More than 18 million law-abiding American families rely on these medicines every year. If one has a common cold, PSE is not as important because there are other products that can help and it is a short-term situation.

       However, if one has ongoing severe allergies, sinus congestion and sinus headache, you live with it for long periods (years). There is nothing "minor" about the pain and discomfort.

My doctor only recommends pseudoephedrine tablets or a nasal decongestant to handle my sinus problems. You can only use the nasal spray for a very short period before it looses its effectiveness. Pseudoephedrine is not a wonder drug, it does not eliminate the sinus problem, but it does provide relief. There is no over-the-counter product available that handles these sinus conditions, as some people would have you believe.

The cost of not passing HR2128 means thousands of visits to doctors, translating to significant costs for Oregonians. This means scheduling a visit with a doctor and taking time off to get a prescription.

But a prescription is good for only a few refills and thus the cycle repeats itself. My doctor does not work for free, so we pay them for every office visit.

If you have health insurance from your employer, there are increased health insurance premiums because of these additional doctor visits and higher drug costs.

The truth is that Oregon, while experienced a drop in meth labs of the last decade, the majority of the decline came in the years preceding the state's 2005 prescription requirement law.

There is still a meth problem is Oregon. The current law has not solved the problem, yet burdens those who depend on these medicines for relief with unnecessary and costly visits to the doctor.

John Johnson, Gresham

Contract Publishing

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