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I learned that working hard for - and with - my employer allowed me to complete my education.

My father died suddenly when I was 11, so my mom, who had not worked outside the home for 22 years, got a job. It was tough times for our family. Money was tight. But that experience also taught me working hard was important.

I put myself through Portland State University by working as a part-time bookkeeper and going to school part time. My job was at a motor hotel, with 100 employees, just a few blocks from PSU.

I could easily walk to my classes between work and school whenever I needed. Sometimes that was three times a day, depending on my class schedule. Since my school schedule changed every quarter and the Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes were different than the Tuesday/Thursday, each day was different. And each week I needed to study and prepare for my class assignments.

My employer worked hard with me to allow me to determine my own work hours as long as I completed the work he needed me to do. He also gave me the opportunity to pick up extra hours by working at his restaurant as a cashier or at the front desk.

I graduated from PSU in five years and was debt free.

My college life story would not have been possible if Senate Bill 828 were the law of the land. My employer would not have been able to keep up with the required paperwork of all the changes, let alone being forced to pay me extra when I needed to change my schedule. I was the bookkeeper and in charge of payroll. SB 828 would have been an overly burdensome nightmare for me to keep up with.

What I appreciated about those years was the wonderful working relationship I had with my boss, who benefited from my ability to do my job, but also was willing to let me work around my school responsibilities.

I learned that working hard for — and with — my employer allowed me to complete my much-needed education.

I hate to think how my life would have turned out if SB 828, predictive scheduling, was the law of the land then.

Joan Albertson

Gresham

Contract Publishing

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