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Readers' letters: Local gun banks could solve problems

by: TRIBUNE PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER ONSTOTT - Recent public shootings, like the Dec. 11 attack that killed two people at Clackamas Town Center, has prompted suggestions that guns be regulated.I think the only solution to this issue is getting guns out of homes (Gun control bills load up for a fight, Dec. 20), irregardless of how responsible individual gun owners may be.

I’ve proposed the creation of Community Gun Banks as a way to provide gun owners safe access to their firearms without restrictions on types or numbers. Community Gun Banks would be locally controlled and could be co-located with gun clubs, local militias and similar organizations to provide controlled access among ones peers.

Jeff Woodall

Southeast Portland

Don’t give TriMet ads equal weight

How can you equate the two ads on TriMet? One is obviously hate speech and one is a map (Fighting words or free speech?, Nov. 8).

Seriously? I’m tired of the media treating opposing views as equally extreme and thereby giving legitimacy to the more extreme views. After the (political) conventions, many media dismissed the extreme GOP platform view of abortion by simply saying, “the left and right have their extreme platforms.” So just like that, higher tax rates become just as extreme a viewpoint as not allowing abortions in the case if rape.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but that doesn’t make them all right or even equal.

David Linn

Northeast Portland

Bikes, cars better learn to ‘dance’

I enjoyed reading the bicycle article by Peter Korn (Ridin’ with Mary Poppins, Oct. 25). And it presented accurate, timely information.

But in my opinion, it missed the main point: Drivers and riders do not know the law; they do not know the intended dance steps that would coordinate safety between bicycles and cars.

For instance, when a car is clearly turning right and has its right-turn signal on, is it legal for a bicycle to pass it on the right?

Another example: I have been on a quiet but major street such as Holgate signaling for a left turn and waiting for oncoming traffic to pass, and then have an oncoming car stop for me to make my left turn.

According to what I have read in the drivers manual, bicycles are to follow the rules of the road like any other vehicle, unless a change is indicated. But I am not sure how this is applied. And neither is anyone else.

To begin to make a fix, I would put more bike questions in the drivers test. And bicycle riders would also need to pass a test to show that they know and understand the rules of the road.

There is too much at risk not to have everyone doing the same dance steps.

Merry-Lynn Amsbury

Southeast Portland

Bus rapid transit is best alternative

Thank you for the editorial on what is becoming known as BRT: Bus Rapid Transit, from Brazil to Seattle and beyond (Rapid buses rising as an option to rail, Nov. 29).

Denver and Cleveland have also jumped on the bandwagon, realizing the failure of light rail now being touted by cities like Portland as the public transportation of the future is in reality a very costly dinosaur already becoming extinct.

Good for the cities of Milwaukie and Vancouver for steadfastly turning light rail down. Unlike Portland, that likes to fool itself because it buys into the latest hype it feels is hip, those places have not only seen the emperor riding the rails has no clothes but there are no bones underneath to move him anywhere either.

In other words, light rail is all show and no go.

I hope, for a change, Portland will start showing some common sense and do something practical like dump any new plans for light rail and encourage TriMet to bring back the buses and bus routes it has slashed in favor of the shiny choo-choo trains.

Maybe if they hawked BRT on “Portlandia,” Portland would listen.

Vicki Harrison

Southeast Portland