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Port director Wyatt to retire on June 30

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The Port of Portland currently owns four marine terminals, five business parks, and the Portland International, Hillsboro and Troutdale airports. Wyatt was hired as executive director in 2011, jut weeks before the Sept. 11 attacks.


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO - Port of Portland Executive Director Bill WyattPort of Portland Executive Director Bill Wyatt has formally announced he will retire on June 30. The Port's nine commissioners will appoint his successor. A recruitment process will be announced later this week.

"It has been an enormous privilege to have served the Port for the past 16 years. The Port's best successes during my tenure have been the result of collaboration and partnership and I want to thank the many stakeholders and community members who have played a role in helping the Port carry out its mission of providing access to global markets and land for job creation," Wyatt said in a statement released Wednesday.

The Port of Portland currently owns four marine terminals, five business parks, and the Portland International, Hillsboro and Troutdale airports. Wyatt was hired as executive director in 2001, just weeks before the Sept. 11 attacks.

In addition to overseeing all of the security changes in the airport and terminal operations as a result of those attacks, Wyatt is credited with returning international service to the Portland airport and initiating $2 billion in improvements there over the next few years. He also oversaw millions of dollars in the terminal operations following the $199 million Columbia River navigation channle deeping project, completing the state's largest brownfield redvelopment project at the Troutdale Reynolds industrial Park, aquiring the Gresham Vista Business Park, and reducing Port-wide greenhouse gas emissions from Port source to 20 percent below 1990 levels.

"Bill has been a skilled, dynamic and admired leader and I know I speak for all of the Commission when I say how grateful we are for his unparalleled service," said Port Commission President Jim Carter.

But the Port also lost all international cargo shipping business during Wyatt's tenure during a still-unresolved labor dispute between the foreign-owned operator and the Longshoreman's union that represents most of the workers there. Both the Port and State of Oregon have been unable to recruit new shipping lines or develop Portland-based alternative shipping methods for those who used the deep water terminal.

Before his appointment, Wyatt, a native Oregonian raised in Astoria, served as a state representative from there from 1974 to 1977. He then served five years as Executive Director of the Association for Portland Progress, six years as President of the Oregon Business Council, and seven years as Chief of Staff to former Oregon Governor John A. Kitzhaber.