Featured Stories

Local Weather

Cloudy

61°F

Portland

Cloudy

Humidity: 83%

Wind: 7 mph

  • 2 Jun 2015

    Showers 61°F 53°F

  • 3 Jun 2015

    AM Showers 66°F 51°F


Three measures attract most spending

GMO labeling requirement in Measure 92 sets Oregon record of almost $26 million spent.


Three statewide measures on Tuesday’s ballot generated lopsided spending, including Oregon’s most expensive in history.

Measure 92, which would require labeling of food containing genetically modified organisms sold in Oregon, has set a record with almost $27 million raised in the campaigns for and against it.

Supporters raised $7.8 million and spent $7.4 million; about $1 million was spent in signature-gathering efforts to qualify the measure for the ballot.

Opponents raised $19 million — exceeding the $12 million amassed by tobacco companies against a proposed cigarette tax increase in 2007 — and spent $18 million.

That 2007 campaign set the previous record at $15 million spent by both sides.

Major contributors to Measure 92: Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, $1.65 million; Center for Food Safety Action Fund, $1.2 million; Mercola.com, $700,000; Tom Hormel, $500,000; Organic Consumers Fund, $425,000; Food Democracy Action, $300,000; Presence Marketing, $200,000; Friends of the Earth, $125,000; Ben & Jerry’s, $115,000.

Major contributors against Measure 92: Monsanto Co., $4.6 million; DuPont Pioneer, $4.5 million; PepsiCo, $2.35 million; Coca-Cola, $1.17 million; Dow AgroSciences, $1.15 million; Kraft Foods, $870,000; Land O’Lakes, $760,000; General Mills, $695,000; Mondelez International, $330,000; Hershey Co., $320,000; J.M. Smucker Co., $295,000; Kellogg Co., $275,000; ConAgra, $250,000; Bimbo Bakeries USA, $230,000; Grocery Manufacturers Association, $165,000; Abbott Nutrition, $160,000; McCormick & Co., $130,000; Cargill, $111,000.

On Measure 90, which would allow the top two finishers in a primary to advance to the general election regardless of party, supporters heavily outspent opponents.

Supporters raised $5.2 million and spent $5.1 million. The bulk of the money came from two sources: John Arnold, natural-gas trader, $2.2 million through Open Primaries — he contributed $2.75 million to that committee — and Michael Bloomberg, business magnate and former New York City mayor, $1.9 million. Oregon business groups contributed most of the rest.

Sponsors spent about $500,000 to qualify their measure for the ballot.

Opponents raised $1.5 million and spent $1.23 million. The most came from the union-backed Defend Oregon, $950,000; other unions also contributed.

On Measure 91, which would legalize marijuana for recreational use, supporters heavily outspent opponents.

Supporters raised $3.9 million and spent $3.5 million. Among major contributors were Drug Policy Action, $1.73 million; New Approach PAC, $1.1 million — both based outside Oregon — and New Approach Oregon PAC, $644,000.

Sponsors spent about $600,000 to qualify their measure for the ballot.

Opponents raised and spent less than $200,000. A county sheriffs’ political action committee contributed, $145,000, and the Oregon Narcotics Enforcement Association, $20,000.

pwong@PamplinMedia.com

(503) 503) 385-4899

twitter.com/capitolwong

JW_DISQUS_ADD_A_COMMENT