Featured Stories


Community calendar

Monday, June 2

Maxwell Neely-Cohen presents “Echo of the Boom”

Efram gets kicked out of every school in the known universe. Molly is raised in total isolation by survivalists. Steven grows up globetrotting with his ex-spy father. Chloe rules three thousand students with an iron fist. A frenetic journey through contemporary youth culture, “Echo of the Boom” follows the lives of these four characters as their narratives orbit and intertwine. They wage personal wars, grapple for power, and attempt to understand their roles in the future of society--or their destiny in hastening its destruction. The result is a mesmerizing collection of triumphs and calamities, a chronicle brimming with the language of music, social networking, and video games. Equal parts “Gossip Girl” and “Gravity's Rainbow,” “Echo of the Boom” represents a new kind of literature explicitly suited to the twenty-first century. Event takes place at 7 p.m. at Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway.

Tuesday, June 3

Strategies for a Sustainable Income in Retirement

In this workshop for adults, the Society for Financial Awareness will teach participants how to establish retirement goals and strategies for a sustainable income in retirement. Program takes place from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. at Hillsdale Library, 1525 SW Sunset Blvd.

Registration required; register online, in the library or by calling 503-988-5234.

Thursday, June 5

Goodbye grass, hello turf

Come to a groundbreaking event for Wilson’s new turf field. Immediately following the spring football intrasquad scrimmage — the last event on the old field — will be the groundbreaking ceremony for the new turf field. Barbecue will be available for a suggested donation of $8. Event takes place from 5 to 9 p.m. at Wilson High School, 1151 SW Vermont St.

Oregon Short Story Anthology Reading: “The Night, and the Rain, and the River”

Four Oregon authors — Jan Baross, Gail Bartley, Steve Denniston, and Jackie Shannon Hollis — read from “The Night, and the Rain, and the River,” an anthology from local publisher Forest Avenue Press, and edited by Multnomah Village's own Liz Prato. A current of longing runs through 22 short stories by Oregon writers. As the characters strive for connection, they make mistakes, reach out to the wrong people, and recalibrate their lives based on what they desire, whether or not it’s attainable — or even a good idea. A shy pyromaniac takes a chance on love. A young woman hands her decisions to a man she’s never met. An abandoned father and son struggle to pull a stump from the stubborn ground, the town wailer loses her voice after her mother’s death, and a cloudless Oregon sky triggers a trip for a final goodbye. Editor Liz Prato has curated a powerful collection of smart, funny, sad, and exquisite stories about the losses that shape our lives. Event takes place at 7 p.m. at Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway.

Friday, June 6

Book signing: “A Long, Long Journey: A Century of Memories”

Local author and centenarian John B. Smith will spend First Friday in Multnomah Village signing copies of his autobiography, “A Long, Long Journey: A Century of Memories.” Books will be available for purchase during the signing, with hard copies for $20, paperbacks for $10 and bookmarks for $2. Event takes place from 5 to 7 p.m. at Umpqua Bank, 7837 SW Capitol Highway.

Saturday, June 7

Traditional Craft Demonstrations

Grand Ronde Tribal member Greg Archuleta will share traditional and contemporary Native American craft demonstrations from Western Oregon and the Columbia River region. Activities will include traditional basketry and carving exhibited and demonstrations on the uses of materials such as Western Red Cedar, tule, cattail and other natural materials will be provided. Event takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. at Tryon Creek State Natural Area, 11321 SW Terwilliger Blvd.

No registration required. For more information call 503-636-9886, ext. 225

Monday, June 9

Dealing with Debt: Strategies and Facts You Should Know

Learn about managing debt and credit issues in today's economic environment. Tim L. Eblen and Michelle Freed are experts in the area of debtor/creditor law. In this program for adults, they will highlight strategies in addressing debt obligations effectively and educate participants on their legal rights when it comes to those debt obligations, e.g., consumer protection laws, and bankruptcy laws. Program takes place from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. at Capitol Hill Library Meeting Room, 10723 SW Capitol Highway.

First come, first served.

Tuesday, June 10

Robert Rotstein presents Reckless Disregard

Former topnotch attorney Parker Stern, still crippled by courtroom stage fright, takes on a dicey case for an elusive video game designer known to the world only by the name of “Poniard.” In Poniard's blockbuster online video game, “Abduction!,” a real-life movie mogul is charged with kidnapping and murdering a beautiful actress who disappeared in the 1980s. Predictably, the mogul — William "the Conqueror" Bishop — has responded with a libel lawsuit. Now it's up to Parker to defend the game designer in the suit. In defending Poniard, Parker discovers that people aren't who they claim to be and that nothing is as it seems. At one point, his client resorts to blackmail, threatening to expose a dark secret about Parker. Then, many of the potential witnesses who could have helped the case die prematurely, and the survivors are too frightened to talk. Parker begins to feel as if he's merely a character in a video game, fighting malevolent Level Bosses who appear out of nowhere and threaten to destroy him. Event takes place at 7 p.m. at Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway.

Tuesday, June 17

Spin! Pop! Boom!

How do you know that a chemical reaction has occurred? Start with a change of color in achemically challenging “magic trick.” Move on to an assortment of experiments featuring both chemical and physical changes. Watch in awe as the Mad Scientist creates numerous versions of erupting science. Program takes place from 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Capitol Hill Library, 10723 SW Capitol Highway.

First come, first served. Seating outside. Come prepared for weather.

The Air in Me

In this program for adults, meet Daniel L. Johnson. His book, “The Air in Me,” is a collection of prose and poetry. Some of the work is centered on the writings and musings of an aging gay man in the 21st century. Program takes place from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. at Hillsdale Library, 1525 SW Sunset Blvd.

First come, first served.

Thursday, June 19

Jack Hart presents “Skookum Summer”

As “Skookum Summer” begins, the year is 1981, and reporter Tom Dawson slinks back to his tiny Puget Sound hometown after making a disastrous mistake at the Los Angeles Times. Working reluctantly at the local weekly, the Big Skookum Echo, Tom is drawn into investigating a powerful logger's murder. As the mystery deepens, the murder exposes the strains on the community as pollution, development, and global change threaten traditional Northwest livelihoods. It also forces Tom to confront his own past and discover what home really means to him. Hart weaves together a gripping and suspenseful plot with richly observed Pacific Northwest history and a vivid picture of a community on the brink of change. Event takes place at 7 p.m. Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway.

Friday, June 20

Summer Solstice

Celebrate the longest day and shortest night of the year by going on an evening guided walk in the park. The Friends of Tryon Creek will talk about what creates seasons, cultural celebrations for summer solstice from around the world, and discover the highlights of the forest this season.

This is a free event for all ages.

Registration is necessary. Sign up in advance online at tryonfriends.org. For more information contact Deb Hill, Deborah. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 503-636-9886, ext. 225.

Sunday, June 22

2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the Mittleman Jewish Community Center! The community is celebrating this milestone occasion with birthday party complete with musical entertainment, crafts, inflatables, snacks, open rock climbing, pool float, and, of course, cake. Open to all ages. Event takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Mittleman Jewish Community Center, 6651 SW Capitol Hwy, Portland, OR 97219.

This is a free event and open to everyone.

Monday, June 23

Local History Group Open House

All who have an interest in local history are invited to the Multnomah Historical Association open house. The group is dedicated to preserving the history of all Southwest neighborhoods and its primary focus is preserving history, oral histories, photos and memorabilia. Event takes place from 5 to 8:30 p.m. at the Mary Lyman Becker History Center, 2929 SW Multnomah Blvd. No. 107.

For more information, visit multnomahhistorical.com or call 503-893-5549.

Tuesday, June 24

Mz. Pearl’s Variety Show

A clown show filled with magic, physical comedy, juggling, underpants and dance. Heather Pearl's show is a feat to be marveled at. Her inventiveness and abilities astound and surprise all ages. The show has a variety of juggling, magic, dance — with Mz. Pearl's character always being the most captivating. Program takes place from 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Capitol Hill Library, 10723 SW Capitol Highway.

First come, first served. Seating outside. Come prepared for weather.

It’s Time for a Fresh Start: Project Clean Slate

Has your driver’s license been suspended for unpaid fines? Is there a minor criminal conviction on your record that is standing in your way? If you have a record with Multnomah County, Project Clean Slate can help. This workshop for adults introduces the resources and services that can help you make that fresh start. Project Clean Slate is supported by the Multnomah County District Attorneys Office, Multnomah County Public Defenders Office, Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles, and the Independent Development Enterprise Alliance. Program takes place from 7 to 7:45 p.m. at Hillsdale Library, 1525 SW Sunset Blvd.

First come, first served.

Wednesday, June 25

The Science of Sword fighting

In this program for kids and families, the Knights of Veritas — a nonprofit organization specializing in interactive demonstartions of medieval arms, armour, combat, knighthood and chivalry — educational includes discussion of leverage, geometry, physiology, chemistry, physics and more, demonstrating that real life science was alive and well in the combat arts of medieval knights. Program takes place from 2 to 3 p.m. at Hillsdale Library Meeting Room, 1525 SW Sunset Blvd.

First come, first served.

Kate Payne presents “The Hip Girl's Guide to the Kitchen”

The author of “The Hip Girl's Guide to Homemaking” shows you how to love your kitchen and learn to make creative, delicious food without breaking your budget. You can become a confident cook — even if the drawer with the take-out menus is the only part of your kitchen you currently use Kate Payne shows you how to master basic cooking techniques — boiling, baking, and sauteing — and simplifies the process of fancy ones, like jamming and preserving, dehydrating, braising, roasting, infusing, and pickling. With this straightforward and fun guide, you can stock up your kitchen with the ingredients, tools, and appliances you'll actually use. You'll also learn how to decode recipes and alter them to make them gluten-free, dairy-free, or vegan. The Hip Girl's Guide to the Kitchen includes advice and instructions on how to make both classic meals and foods that are typically bought, such as yogurt; ice cream; flavored salt; oil and vinegar infusions; kimchi; aioli; jam; granola; bread; and fruit leather — even liqueurs, iced teas, and vegetable juices. With fun line drawings, sidebars full of tips and tricks, and lists of resources, Kate Payne sets you up for success and shows you how to unlock your inner kitchen prowess. Event takes place at 7 p.m. at Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway.

Thursday, June 26

Janet Fisher presents “A Place of Her Own”

After leaving home at a young age and defying her parents to marry the dashing Garrett Maupin, Martha Maupin's future became bound up with some of the most extraordinary events in antebellum American history, eventually leading to her journey to a new life on the Oregon Trail. After Garrett Maupin died in 1866, leaving her alone on the frontier with their many children, Martha Maupin was torn between grief and relief after a difficult marriage. Lone mothers had few options in her day, but she took charge of her own dream and bought her own place, which is now one of the few Century Farms in Oregon named for a woman. “A Place of Her Own” is the story of the author's great-great-grandmother's daring decision to buy that farm on the Oregon frontier after the death of her husband--and story of the author's own decision to keep that farm in the family. Janet Fisher's journey into the past to uncover her own family history as she worked to keep the property interweaves with the tales from her ancestors' lives during the years leading up to the Mexican-American War in the East and her great-great-grandmother's harrowing journey across the Oregon Trail with her young family and finally tells the tale of Martha's courageous decision to strike out on her own in Oregon. This book will hold special appeal for Oregon Trail buffs and the many people in this country whose ancestors took that terrible trek, as well as others interested in American history of that period. Event takes place at 7 p.m. at Annie Bloom’s Books, 7834 SW Capitol Highway.

Monday, June 30

Balloon City Experiments

Using balloons and props, Charles and Biscuit the Dog Puppet conduct a silly but sound engineering experiment involving a pulley. Charles tells a story about a child scientist. Then, with help from the audience and lots of entertaining assistance from Biscuit, Balloon City is constructed filling the stage with balloon structures artistically placed to form a cityscape. This is a group project with hands-on audience participation. Program takes place from 3 to 3:45 p.m. at Hillsdale Library Meeting Room, 1525 SW Sunset Blvd.

First come, first served.