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A new 'Point' of view

Husband and wife duo are new owners of Centre Point Physical Therapy


by: CONNECTION PHOTO: DREW DAKESSIAN - Kathleen Meyer, Jim Cavin and their daughter Brooksley, who inspired their move to Southwest. Philosopher John Locke once opined, “A sound mind in a sound body, is a short, but full description of a happy state in this world.” If you seek such a sound body, look no further than Centre Point Physical Therapy.

Open for business in Hillsdale Main Street since 2004, Centre Point is recently under new management; husband and wife duo Jim Cavin and Kaylene Meyer took ownership of the clinic in February.

The couple, who reside in the Multnomah neighborhood, are recent imports to the Southwest community, having just moved to moved from New York in early January.

They had been planning to relocate and acquire a physical therapy clinic for some time so their daughter could be closer to their families in Nevada and Montana, but held off until the right situation presented itself.

It did, in the form of Centre Point — though it didn’t seem so at first.

“I did clinical affiliations in 2001 at Harborview Hospital in Seattle, and I was a little wary of the weather,” Cavin said. “Then I started to have second thoughts. It was a small business, with very little overhead, and because of that, was relatively low risk. The cost of living was lower. Southwest Airlines flew direct from where my parents lived and we liked the city. We decided that we could give it a go, and if the weather got to be too much we would deal with that later. Fortunately, the weather overall has been fabulous since we arrived.”

All in all, Cavin said, the surrounding area has turned out to be a wonderful locale in which to live.

“We like the area … mostly because it is near Baker & Spice and the library,” he said. “We live between the clinic and Multnomah Village, so we can walk to both. There are a lot of parks; we are close to the Southwest Community Center.”

Centre Point itself has proven to be a good fit for Cavin and Meyer as well.

“The previous owner developed a strong program in women’s health and the treatment of chronic pain, which we will continue with. … Kaylene is a certified lactation counselor, and she is available to provide private consultations and to teach classes to groups of new/expectant mothers as well,” Cavin said.

While building on the clinic’s longtime services, Cavin said he and Meyer are also planning on expanding the lineup of services treated at Centre Point.

“We will … place a much greater emphasis on sports and other orthopedic injuries, including pediatrics,” he said. “Both of us are athletes and have worked with a lot of athletes, and therapeutic exercise is a big, big part of what we do.”

And the couple have allowed their new situation to guide them as they develop their business model.

“The main thing that sets us apart now is that we only see one patient each hour. It is truly 1:1 care,” Cavin said. “Due to declining insurance reimbursement in the face of rising costs we have never been able to do that (before) … but due to the low overhead established by the previous owner, we are able to. So it is a nice change, and I am finding that the patients do seem to improve a bit faster with that level of care.”

In addition, he said, “We do … get to work a lot more on proper posture and very precise movement and very precise exercises, addressing abnormal patterns and helping the patient fix them. Simple strengthening and stretching and balance work is great for health, but many times … addressing injuries and pain is much more complicated than just qualitatively improving those parameters.”

As they settle into their second month as the new owners of Centre Point Physical Therapy, Meyer and Cavin are starting to realize their hopes for the future of the clinic.

“We’d like to be recognized as a go-to place in Portland for treatment of orthopedic injuries, both by patients and physicians, and not just for our results, but also for ensuring that patients know that we listen to them and care about them,” Cavin said. “We would like to grow enough to add another therapist so that we can spend more time on community outreach and both learning from and teaching other professionals and students.”