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Scappoose pastor to be arraigned Tuesday

St. Wenceslaus' Father Michael Patrick granted supervised release from Clark County Jail


by: SPOTLIGHT FILE PHOTO - Father Michael Patrick of St. Wenceslaus Catholic Church in Scappoose was arrested last month for allegedly luring a minor.A Scappoose pastor who was arrested April 2 in Los Angeles for allegedly luring a minor has been extradited from California to Vancouver, Washington.

Father Michael Patrick, 57, of St. Wenceslaus Catholic Church in Scappoose, had his first court appearance in Clark County April 25 and is slated for arraignment Tuesday, May 6.

Patrick was detained in Los Angeles International Airport on a Washington state arrest warrant while traveling home from vacation in Australia. Patrick allegedly attempted to lure a 14-year-old girl into his vehicle on the evening of March 10. The incident occurred in Vancouver, where Patrick has a second residence apart from his Oregon home, according to the Vancouver Police Department.

Patrick Robinson, Clark County deputy prosecutor with the Children’s Justice Center in Vancouver, said Patrick is no longer lodged at the Clark County Jail, but was granted a supervised release.

“He has to check in, live at a certified address and not have contact with children,” Robinson said, adding that officials issued a “no harassment” order to Patrick concerning the victim.

Robinson could not confirm whether Patrick is staying at his Vancouver home or another residence.

Patrick’s first court appearance consisted of a listing of his charges. During his Tuesday arraignment, Patrick will enter his plea on the matter.

Bud Bunce, director of communications with the Archdiocese of Portland through which Patrick is employed, said the archdiocese will not pay for Patrick’s attorney. Bunce said he had no information on Patrick’s status.

Luring in the state of Washington is considered a class C felony and carries with it a maximum sentence of five years in a correctional facility, a fine of $10,000 or both, according to the Revised Code of Washington.

Vancouver police were led to Pactrick by the license plate number of his vehicle, which was provided by the girl he allegedly lured, according to an affidavit of probable cause from the Vancouver Police Department. An officer visited Patrick’s home the day of the incident. Patrick at the time denied having contact with any girl that night, according to the affidavit, which also notes the suspect took long pauses prior to answering questions and at one point began to tear up.

The arresting officer then took the victim to Patrick’s home in order to allow her to identify him as the alleged offender. The girl, seeing Patrick’s front and side profile as well as his vehicle, said she was sure Patrick was the man who followed her, the affidavit states.

Vancouver police executed a search warrant on Patrick’s property while he was in Australia. Officers found and collected a blue collar shirt — matching the victim’s initial description of her offender.

The investigation, police say, is ongoing.