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Lawmakers and regulators force those in need through a labyrinth of eligibility requirements to receive services

Hey, Julie Parrish! Have I got a deal for you! Get Congress to pass the Medicare for All bill and all our state budget woes regarding Medicaid will shrivel. If you are so concerned about lining the pockets of for-profit providers, why not expand and incentivize the use of county public health services in a way that they could handle the load? Working with Medicaid auditors, I have seen first-hand how our so called "wasteful" system works. Lawmakers and regulators force those in need through a labyrinth of eligibility requirements to receive services. Once deemed financially eligible, a detailed treatment plan is required before services are paid for.

It is not uncommon for a procedure/service to be provided in quick response to a changing human condition. It may be Medicaid-eligible, but if the need is not documented first in the treatment plan, payment for that service is labeled "improper." That's NOT fraud. That's a timing issue that put the patient first before paperwork. Are there disreputable providers out there?

Sure. But in my experience, the vast majority of improprieties were innocent mistakes that could be greatly reduced with adequate staffing. Ultimately, the patient was healthier for receipt of that "improper" service. Isn't health the primary objective? In my view, the best deal for state governments, small businesses and individuals is Medicare for All. It is time to stop this aristocratic business of declaring who of us is worthy of good health and who is not. A healthy citizenry should not be measured as a taxpayer burden, but rather a return on investment. To essentially say, "I got mine so now close the door" is most unbecoming.

Kim Duncan,

West Linn

Contract Publishing

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