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Storytelling series to start at Newmark Theatre on Oct. 2 with NASA astronaut Terry Virts, who spent much time aboard the International Space Station.

COURTESY: DAVID DOUBLET
COURTESY: DAVID DOUBLET
COURTESY: DAVID DOUBLET
COURTESY: DAVID DOUBLET - David Doubilet, who will speak at the Newmark Theatre on Nov. 20, took this stunning photo of a baby green sea turtle in French Polynesia.
Those enamored by the captivating images and talent that come out of the National Geographic universe will have the opportunity to dive in as part of "National Geographic Live" — a program of speakers, films and concerts presented by Portland'5 coming to the Newmark Theatre, 1111 S.W. Broadway.

The 2017-2018 season will comprise five different events, including an astronaut, two photojournalists, a writer and filmmaker, and a primatologist/television correspondent.

"National Geographic Live" is the events division of the historic National Geographic brand, and hosts the series in cities around the world.

Subscriptions to the full series range from $130-$230, plus a $18.50 order fee, while individual lecture tickets range from $25-$50. They can be bought online through Portland'5 online box office, TicketsWest outlets, www.ticketswest.com/outlets/, or by phone at 800-273-1530.

The lineup:

'View From Above'

7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 2

The first event of of the series features Terry Virts, a NASA astronaut who spent much time aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and installed the Cupola module, an observatory that allowed for an unprecedented 360-degree view of the Earth.

He became the commander of the station and took more photographs using the module than anyone who came before him. The photos were compiled into a National Geographic book called "View From Above" and an IMAX film titled "A Beautiful Planet."

'Coral Kingdoms

and Empires of Ice'

7:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 20

Groundbreaking underwater photojournalists David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes, who's also an aquatic biologist, will take the Newmark stage to show stunning imagery from their assignments in faraway places such as the warm, tropical Papua New Guinea, all the way to the frozen tundra in Antarctica.

Doubilet has been a photographer and writer for the magazine since 1971.

'Rhinos, Rickshaws and Revolutions'

Monday, Jan. 22, 2018

Ami Vitale is a wildlife photojournalist who's seen it all, including living in mudhuts and war-torn areas of conflict. Her work has taken her to 90 countries. Her first National Geographic assignment, though, was a story that documented the last rickshaws in Kolkata, India, and more recently has covered the African country of Kenya's northern white rhinos and the communities trying to protect them.

On the stage she'll share her personal stories of living in these areas and "living the story" — her life philosophy.

NATGEOLIVE/MICHAEL DAVIE - Ami Vitale photographing during a monsoon.

'Between River and Rim: Hiking the Grand Canyon'

7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 19 ($30-$50)

Ever wonder what it would be like to trek the entire length of the Grand Canyon, by foot?

Writer Kevin Fedarko and photographer and filmmaker Pete McBride will tell their tale of taking on the feat this year.

McBride has much travel under his belt, to more than 70 countries, for agencies including the National Geographic Society, Outsidemagazine, Patagonia and The Nature Conservancy.

Fedarko was a top editor at Outside magazine but left to do the Grand Canyon trip, and has been featured in National Geographic publications, Esquire, Time and others.

'Pink Boots and a Machete'

7:30 p.m. Monday, March 5, 2018

Having been hailed as the "female Indiana Jones," respected primatologist and television correspondent Mireya Mayor has traveled to some of the world's most remote places, and has survived poisonous inspect bites, been charged by gorillas and chased by elephants.

She even discovered a rare new species of mouse lemur in 2000, which at the time was thought to be the world's smallest primate. The discovery paved the way for the prime minister of Madagascar to establish a national park to protect the species. These days, Mayor has her own television show on Nat Geo WILD, called "Wild Nights with Mireya Mayor," which aims to be an inspiration to young women interested in science exploration.

At the series, she'll share photos, stories, video clips and more about her time in the field.