FONT

MORE STORIES


UPDATE: Hours after peaceful rally and march, raucous groups clash with police.


TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Protesters and police clashed during the late evening Friday, hours after a peaceful rally and march at Pioneer Courthouse Square.Five people were arrested Friday after protesters clashed with police late into the evening. Police closed Pioneer Courthouse Square before 10 p.m., firing flash grenades at protesters who refused to leave.

The conflict came hours after several thousand people peacefully marched through downtown Portland's streets to protest the inauguration of President Donald J. Trump.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Portland police used pepper spray on parts of the crowd that marched through downtown streets Friday night.TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Protesters who continued to march through the streets Friday night, hours after a peaceful rally and march, were prevented by police from blocking downtown traffic and bridges.Crowds stretched for several blocks after leaving Pioneer Courthouse Square shortly before 5 p.m. Jan. 20. The march followed Southwest Sixth Avenue and then turned to gather outside City Hall on Southwest Fourth Avenue.

Police kept a low profile, but a line of bicycle officers blocked access to the Morrison Bridge, preventing the crowd from walking onto the busy road. TriMet trains and buses were blocked several times, and the agency delayed service downtown during parts of the evening as protesters continued through the streets.

Gregory McKelvey, Portland's Resistance organizer and a leader of Friday's rally and march, used a bullhorn to urge the crowd to demand action from City Hall as national policies change under a more conservative administration.

"We need to let the people in City Hall know that we need them to protect us from Donald Trump," McKelvey said.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ - Protesters burned American flags Friday afternoon during an anti-Trump rally in Pioneer Courthouse Square.TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Several thousand people marched through downtown streets Friday evening after a rally in Pioneer Courthouse Square.TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Portland police blocked access to the Morrison Bridge as the crowd moved north on Second Avenue.Marchers followed drummers and a marching band, which sometimes played funk as the crowd danced and chanted.

People began gathering early Friday afternoon in Pioneer Courthouse Square as a weekend of marches and rallies kicked off to protest the inauguration of President Trump.

About 200 people were in the square by 2:30 p.m. Jan. 20, with nearly an equal number of media cameras and reporters around the square. Some people burned American flags in protest during the rally. People burned several large and small flags. A cheer went up from the crowd each time a flag caught fire.

About two hours later, several thousand people packed the square and listened to a parade of speakers.





Friday's protest was organized by Portland's Direct Action Alliance, which called for a two-hour rally and march. Other protests are planned Friday evening.

On Saturday, Jan. 21, will be the Women's March, which could attract more than 30,000 people to Portland's waterfront for a rally and march.

Mayor Ted Wheeler and Portland Police Chief Mike Marshman said this week that police officers would not interfere with the groups' peaceful rallies and marches, but would step in if some people tried to block public transit downtown or destroyed property.

The five arrests came after the smaller group of protestors turned violent. A sixth person, Billy Ellison, was arrested earlier in the afternoon in connection with a November protest.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Some people tried to confront protesters who burned American flags Friday afternoon in Pioneer Courthouse Square.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Protesters burned several American flags during Friday's rally and march in Portland Courthouse Square.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Speakers urged the several hundred people in Pioneer Courthouse Square Friday afternoon to take action and defend their rights.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Organizers of Friday's rally and march in Pioneer Courthouse Square expected more than 1,000 people to gather in downtown.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Members of the groups gathered Friday afternoon in Pioneer Courthouse Square meditated during the rally.TriMet said it would monitor the protests and suspend downtown transit service if groups became violent.

During Friday afternoon's rally, street preachers used loudspeakers on the north side of the square to argue with members of the groups gathered for the protest. Some minor pushing and shoving broke out, but was soon deescalated by both sides.

TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Thousands of people gathered in Pioneer Courthouse Square and cheered speakers.McKelvey told the crowd to avoid touble, even if provoked. "If you see somone you do not agree with, do not engage. The camera go to that and it becomes the story. The story is America elected a Diet Fascist and Portland rejects that."

After a poem about a friend being tased, read by Alice, a Roosevelt High School senior, Latino activist Francisco Lopez told the crowd that President Trump's inauguration speech wasn't about them. "Today, Donald Trump was speaking to white America," Lopez said.

For nearly two hours, other speakers urged action on sexual violence, homelessness, affordable housing and renter relief.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Dishwasher Paul (last name not given) is a veteran who washes dishes at the VA hospital at OHSU. "I'm anti-Trump 100 percent, and everyone will soon realize that." He had not watched the inauguration, "I had better things to do. I am not happy today, totally not happy. Not, not good."

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Gregory McKelvey with white bullhorn, center, stopped the anti-Trump march outside City Hall to say that Portlanders deserve the mayor's protection from Trump.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Roosevelt HS poet Alexis does some spoken word for the crowd assembled around 4 pm at Pioneer Courthouse Square.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Ben Labine was feeling sick Friday and took a day off from his retail job. He said he was content walking around with his 'Boo, Donald' sign, which had a short essay on the back side about the dangers of authoritarianism, but said he would not stick around "if it gets real hairy."

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - A drone, center right at skyline, flies above the anti-Trump rally in Pioneer Courthouse Square Friday afternoon Civilians are not allowed to fly drones over people or in densely populated areas. PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Close up of the drone flying above the anti-Trump rally in Pioneer Courthouse Square Friday afternoon.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Janet Baker said "I came because I love America and I could hide behind my keyboard and be all pious but I needed to stand up, and I'm standing up, this is the first protest I've ever been to.'

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Sarah Elkinton and Janet Baker don't like big crowds so were hanging by the edges, at the benches at the raised west end of Pioneer Courthouse Square.  Sarah Elkinton, a speech and hearing sciences student at PSU, said "I try to live a good life, but when it  gets to be too much inside that you feel like you're going to explode, find people who have the same sort of bubbling inside and be with them." Her first protest was in D.C. in high school in the build up to the invasion of Iraq under George W. Bush.  "It's reassuring to see there other people like me who feel this is not the America we know and believe in. And it's better to be here with people than sulking in your apartment or posting needlessly angry things and feeding trolls on Facebook."

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - Mathew dos Santos of the ACLU addresses the crowd at PCS. 'We are the people. Look around, this is a moment in history.'


PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN
 - Signs were many and varied at the anti-Trump protest, this one referring to stunned progressives's adoption of the safety pin symbol.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - A puppet of Donald Trump dressed as a Klansman.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - A sign riffing on conservative economic theory.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN - A sign referring to President Trump's skin color.

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JOSEPH GALLIVAN
 - Ryan, who would not give his last name or Army rank, stood alone in PCS at 7pm as the rump of the marchers were heading back to the square. He said he left his civilian job, took care of his child and came down to Pioneer Courthouse Square when he heard there had been flag burning. "I saw the burned remains of Old Glory and figured I'd honor the fallen," he said. He brought the foam pipe cladding as a flagpole because he had heard sticks were banned. He said his actions were not about the election. "It's just about me flying the colors I love and that I've sworn to protect."

Tribune reporters Joseph Gallivan and Kevin Harden contributed to this news story.

Go to top
Template by JoomlaShine